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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

SCHEDULE 14A

Proxy Statement Pursuant to Section 14(a) of the

Securities Exchange Act of 1934

(Amendment No.)

Filed by the Registrant                              Filed by a Party other than the Registrant  

Check the appropriate box:

Preliminary Proxy Statement

Confidential, for Use of the Commission Only (as permitted by Rule 14a-6(e)(2))

Definitive Proxy Statement

Definitive Additional Materials

Soliciting Material Pursuant to § 240.14a-12

G-III APPAREL GROUP, LTD.

(Name of Registrant as Specified In Its Charter)

(Name of Person(s) Filing Proxy Statement, if other than the Registrant)

Payment of filing fee (Check the appropriate box):

No fee required.

Fee paid previously with preliminary materials.

Fee computed on table in exhibit required by Item 25(b) per Exchange Act Rules 14a-6(i)(1) and 0-11.

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2024

NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS AND PROXY STATEMENT

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Graphic

G-III APPAREL GROUP, LTD.

512 SEVENTH AVENUE

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10018

Dear Stockholder:

You are cordially invited to attend the Annual Meeting of Stockholders of G-III Apparel Group, Ltd. will be held on Tuesday, June 18, 2024 at 10:00 a.m., New York time, at the offices of Norton Rose Fulbright US LLP, 1301 Avenue of the Americas, 30th Floor, New York, New York 10019.

Only stockholders of record at the close of business on April 26, 2024, the record date for the Annual Meeting, are entitled to notice of and to vote at the Annual Meeting and any adjournments thereof. Stockholders who own shares of our common stock beneficially through a bank, broker or other nominee will also be entitled to attend the Annual Meeting.

The formal Notice of Meeting and the accompanying Proxy Statement set forth proposals for your consideration this year. You are being asked:

1

To elect thirteen directors to serve on our Board of Directors for the ensuing year,

2

For an advisory and non-binding vote on the compensation of our named executive officers, and

3

To ratify the appointment of Ernst & Young LLP as our independent registered public accounting firm for the fiscal year ending January 31, 2025.

At the meeting, we will also report on the affairs of G-III, and a discussion period will be provided for questions and comments of general interest to stockholders.

We look forward to greeting personally those of you who are able to be present at the meeting. However, whether or not you are able to attend the Annual Meeting, it is important that your shares be represented. Accordingly, you are requested to sign, date and mail, at your earliest convenience, the enclosed proxy in the envelope provided for your use, or vote your shares by calling the telephone number or visiting the website specified on your proxy card or voting instruction form.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Very truly yours,

Graphic

Morris Goldfarb

Chief Executive Officer

May 10, 2024

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G-III APPAREL GROUP, LTD.

512 SEVENTH AVENUE

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10018

NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS AND NOTICE OF INTERNET AVAILABILITY OF PROXY MATERIALS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the “Annual Meeting”) of G-III Apparel Group, Ltd. will be held on:

Graphic

Tuesday,
June 18, 2024

Graphic

10:00 a.m., New York time

Graphic

The offices of Norton Rose Fulbright US LLP

1301 Avenue of the Americas 30th Floor

New York, New York 10019

For the following purposes:

1

To elect thirteen directors to serve on our Board of Directors for the ensuing year,

2

To hold an advisory and non-binding vote on the compensation of our named executive officers,

3

To ratify the appointment of Ernst & Young LLP as our independent registered public accounting firm for the fiscal year ending January 31, 2025, and

4

To transact such other business as may properly come before the Annual Meeting or any adjournment thereof.

Graphic  Only stockholders of record at the close of business on April 26, 2024 will be entitled to notice of and to vote at the Annual Meeting or any adjournment thereof.

All stockholders are cordially invited to attend the Annual Meeting in person. Whether or not you plan to attend the Annual Meeting in person, each stockholder is urged to complete, date and sign the enclosed form of proxy and return it promptly in the envelope provided, or vote your shares by calling the telephone number or visiting the website specified on your proxy card or voting instruction form. No postage is required if the proxy is mailed in the United States. If you vote by telephone or internet, you do not need to mail back your proxy. Stockholders who attend the Annual Meeting may revoke their proxies and vote their shares in person.

Important Notice Regarding the Availability of Proxy Materials for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be Held on June 18, 2024

The Proxy Statement and our 2023 Annual Report to Stockholders are available in the “Investors” section of our website at http://www.giii.com.

By Order of the Board of Directors

Graphic

Michael C. Brady

Secretary

New York, NY

May 10, 2024

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

1

PROXY STATEMENT

   

26

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

1

General Information

28

COMPENSATION DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS

3

PROXY SUMMARY

28

CD&A Table of Contents

3

Annual Meeting of Stockholders

29

Executive Summary

3

Business Information—About G-III

37

Elements of Our Compensation Program—What We Pay and Why

4

Our Business Performance in Fiscal 2024

41

Other Compensation and Governance Programs, Policies and Considerations

8

Our Director Nominees

42

How We Make Compensation Decisions

10

Governance Highlights

43

COMPENSATION COMMITTEE REPORT

10

Stockholder Outreach

44

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION TABLES

10

Corporate Social Responsibility

54

CEO PAY RATIO

12

Human Capital

55

PAY VS. PERFORMANCE

13

Executive Compensation Highlights

59

DIRECTOR COMPENSATION

15

BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP OF COMMON STOCK BY CERTAIN STOCKHOLDERS AND MANAGEMENT

61

PROPOSAL NO. 1 ELECTION OF DIRECTORS

18

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

67

PROPOSAL NO. 2 ADVISORY VOTE ON COMPENSATION OF OUR NAMED EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

18

Board of Directors

18

Audit Committee

68

AUDIT COMMITTEE REPORT

19

Compensation Committee

69

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

20

Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee

70

PROPOSAL NO. 3 RATIFICATION OF APPOINTMENT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

22

Stockholder Communications

71

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS

23

Risk Oversight

72

STOCKHOLDER PROPOSALS

23

Leadership Structure of the Board

73

OTHER BUSINESS

24

Additional Corporate Governance Policies

How to Vote in Advance

Your vote is important. Please vote as soon as possible by one of the methods shown below. Be sure to have your proxy card or voting instruction form in hand and follow the below instructions:

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By telephone – You can vote your shares by calling the number on your proxy card or voting instruction form

Graphic

By Internet – You can vote your shares online at the website shown on your proxy card or voting instruction form

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By mail – Complete, sign, date and return your proxy card or voting instruction form in the postage-paid envelope provided

2024 PROXY STATEMENT / i

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G-III APPAREL GROUP, LTD.

512 SEVENTH AVENUE

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10018

PROXY STATEMENT

General Information

This Proxy Statement (first mailed to stockholders on or about May 10, 2024) is furnished to the holders of common stock, par value $0.01 per share (“Common Stock”), of G-III Apparel Group, Ltd. (“G-III”) in connection with the solicitation by our Board of Directors of proxies for use at the Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the “Annual Meeting”), or at any adjournment thereof, pursuant to the accompanying Notice of Annual Meeting of Stockholders. The Annual Meeting will be held on:

Graphic

Tuesday,
June 18, 2024

Graphic

10:00 a.m., New York time

Graphic

The offices of Norton Rose Fulbright US LLP

1301 Avenue of the Americas 30th Floor

New York, New York 10019

It is proposed that, at the Annual Meeting, we:

1

Elect thirteen directors to serve on our Board of Directors for the ensuing year,

2

Hold an advisory and non-binding vote on the compensation of our named executive officers (“Named Executive Officers” or “NEOs”), and

3

Ratify the appointment of Ernst & Young LLP as our independent registered public accounting firm for the fiscal year ending January 31, 2025.

Management currently is not aware of any other matters that will come before the Annual Meeting. If any other matters properly come before the Annual Meeting, the persons designated as proxies intend to vote in accordance with their best judgment on such matters. Proxies for use at the Annual Meeting are being solicited by our Board of Directors. Proxies will be solicited chiefly by mail; however, certain of our officers, directors, employees and agents, none of whom (except our proxy solicitor D.F. King) will receive additional compensation therefor, may solicit proxies by telephone or other personal contact. In addition to solicitations by mail, we have retained D.F. King to aid in the solicitation of proxies for the Annual Meeting at an estimated fee of $11,500. We will bear the cost of the solicitation of the proxies, including postage, printing and handling, and will reimburse the reasonable expenses of brokerage firms and others for forwarding material to beneficial owners of shares of Common Stock.

REVOCABILITY AND VOTING OF PROXY

A form of proxy for use at the Annual Meeting and a return envelope for the proxy are enclosed, or you may vote your shares by calling the telephone number or visiting the website specified on your proxy card or voting instruction form. If you vote by telephone or internet, you do not need to mail back your proxy. Stockholders may revoke the authority granted by their execution of a proxy at any time prior to the effective exercise of the powers conferred by that proxy, by filing with the Secretary of G-III a written notice of revocation or a duly executed proxy bearing a later date, or by voting in person at the Annual Meeting. Beneficial owners of our Common Stock should contact their bank, brokerage firm or other custodian, nominee, or fiduciary if they wish to revoke their proxy.

2024 PROXY STATEMENT / 1

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Proxy Statement

Shares of Common Stock represented by executed and unrevoked proxies will be voted in accordance with the instructions specified in such proxies. If no instructions are given, the proxies intend to vote the shares represented thereby:

(i)“FOR” the election of each of the thirteen nominees for director as shown on the form of proxy,
(ii)“FOR” approval of the compensation of our Named Executive Officers,
(iii)“FOR” the ratification of the appointment of Ernst & Young LLP as our independent registered public accounting firm for the fiscal year ending January 31, 2025, and
(iv)in accordance with their best judgment on any other matters which may properly come before the meeting.

RECORD DATE AND VOTING RIGHTS

On April 26, 2024, there were 44,965,287 shares of Common Stock outstanding (excluding shares held in treasury). Each of these shares is entitled to one vote upon each of the matters to be presented at the Annual Meeting. Only stockholders of record at the close of business on April 26, 2024 are entitled to notice of and to vote at the Annual Meeting or any adjournment thereof.

The quorum requirement for holding the Annual Meeting and transacting business is a majority of the outstanding shares entitled to be voted at the Annual Meeting. The shares may be present in person or represented by proxy at the Annual Meeting. Abstentions and broker non-votes are counted as present for the purpose of determining the presence of a quorum.

A “broker non-vote” occurs when shares held by a broker, bank, or other nominee in “street name” for a beneficial owner are not voted with respect to a particular proposal because the broker, bank, or other nominee (1) has not received voting instructions from the beneficial owner and (2) lacks discretionary voting power to vote those shares with respect to that particular proposal. Under current Nasdaq rules, brokers have discretionary voting power with respect to the proposal to ratify the appointment of Ernst & Young LLP as our independent registered public accounting firm for the fiscal year ending January 31, 2025, but will not be authorized to vote with respect to the (a) election of our thirteen nominees for director or (b) advisory and non-binding vote on the compensation of our Named Executive Officers, unless you provide voting instructions to your broker.

The affirmative vote of the holders of a plurality of the shares of Common Stock present in person or represented by proxy and entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting is required for the election of directors. The thirteen nominees receiving the highest number of affirmative votes of the shares present in person or represented by proxy and entitled to vote for them shall be elected as directors; provided, however, that pursuant to our Director Selection and Qualification Standards and Resignation Policy, any nominee for director in this uncontested election who receives a greater number of votes “withheld” from his or her election than votes “for” his or her election must tender a written resignation to the Board. The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee and the Board of Directors will consider the resignation and determine whether or not to accept the resignation.

Graphic See “Corporate Governance—Additional Corporate Governance Policies—Director Selection and Qualification Standards and Resignation Policy” for a more complete description of the application of this Policy.

The affirmative vote of the holders of a majority of the shares of Common Stock present in person or represented by proxy and entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting is required to decide the other matters to be voted on at the Annual Meeting.

You may vote “FOR” or “VOTE WITHHELD” with respect to each or all of the director nominees. If you elect not to vote on the election of directors, this will not have any effect on the election of directors. In tabulating the voting results for the election of directors, only “FOR” and “VOTE WITHHELD” votes are counted.

You may vote “FOR,” “AGAINST,” or “ABSTAIN” with respect to the (a) proposal to approve, on an advisory basis, the compensation of our Named Executive Officers and (b) proposal to ratify the appointment of Ernst & Young LLP as our independent registered public accounting firm. If you elect to abstain from voting on any of these proposals, the abstention will have the same effect as an “AGAINST” vote with respect to such proposal.

If you sign and return your accompanying proxy card without giving specific voting instructions, your shares will be voted as recommended by our Board and in accordance with the discretion of the persons named on the accompanying proxy card with respect to any other matters to be voted upon at the Annual Meeting. If you are a beneficial holder and do not return a voting instruction form, your broker may not vote on any of the matters to be presented at the Annual Meeting.

2 \ Graphic

Table of Contents

PROXY SUMMARY

This summary highlights information on the proposals that require your vote at the Annual Meeting, as well as information on our business, our Board of Directors and our corporate governance structure. This summary does not contain all of the information that you should consider before voting and we ask that you read the entire Proxy Statement carefully. As used in the Proxy Statement, “G-III,” “our company” and “we” refer to G-III Apparel Group, Ltd. and its subsidiaries.

Annual Meeting of Stockholders

Proposals That Require Your Vote

Graphic

Date and Time

June 18, 2024,
10:00 a.m. New York time

Proposal

Board Vote
Recommendation

More Information

1

Annual election of 13 directors

GraphicFOR each
Nominee

Page 61

Graphic

Place

The offices of Norton Rose Fulbright US LLP

1301 Avenue of the Americas 30th Floor

New York, New York 10019

2

Advisory vote on the compensation of our Named Executive Officers

GraphicFOR

Page 67

3

Ratification of appointment of independent registered public accounting firm

GraphicFOR

Page 70

Graphic

Availability of Proxy Materials

The Proxy Statement and our 2023 Annual Report to Stockholders are available in the “Investors” section of our website at http://www.giii.com.

Business InformationAbout G-III

G-III designs, sources and markets an extensive range of apparel, including outerwear, dresses, sportswear, swimwear, women’s suits and women’s performance wear, as well as women’s handbags, footwear, small leather goods, cold weather accessories and luggage.

Under the leadership of Morris Goldfarb and a seasoned executive team with a long track record of success, we have evolved from a small leather apparel manufacturer to the diversified apparel company we are today. G-III has a substantial portfolio of more than 30 licensed and proprietary brands, anchored by our key owned brands: DKNY, Donna Karan and Karl Lagerfeld and our newly licensed Nautica and Halston brands, as well as other major licensed brands that currently drive our business, including Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger.

We distribute our products through multiple channels and in markets located in a variety of geographies.

2024 PROXY STATEMENT / 3

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PROXY SUMMARY

Our Business Performance in Fiscal 2024

Fiscal 2024 was an outstanding year. We achieved the second highest year of net income and net income per share in our history and positioned the Company for long term growth and profitability. Late in 2022, our long-term licensor partner, PVH, informed us that it would not grant long-term renewals of our licenses for Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger products and that it intended to produce the products licensed to us as the license agreements expire. Our management was ready to respond to the challenges resulting from this decision. At that time, we entered into amendments to the license agreements for the Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger products that provide for staggered extensions by category. These business lines represented approximately 48% of our net sales in fiscal 2023.

As a result of strategic planning by our management and Board, risk management and contingency planning, we were prepared for this challenge. Our team, led by our Chairman and CEO, Morris Goldfarb, and Vice Chairman and President, Sammy Aaron, used their decades of apparel industry experience and extensive relationships with our retail customers and suppliers to pivot, reducing our dependence on these licenses and concentrating on new initiates. These initiatives included substantial investments to accelerate growth of our key owned brands, Donna Karan, DKNY, and Karl Lagerfeld, as well as entering into new long-term licenses, including for the Nautica and Halston brands. One of the keys to this strategy is to leverage the Company’s owned brands that do not have limits on our ability to sell internationally, through digital channels, or in off-price markets. The Company also intends to leverage our ability to license our owned brands in select categories.

Net Sales

$3.1B

Compares to $3.2B last year

Adjusted EBITDA*

$324M

Compares to $266M last year

Non-GAAP Net Income*

$190M

Compares to $139M last year

Non-GAAP Diluted Net Income Per Share*

$4.04

Compares to $2.85 last year

*Please see Appendix A for a reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA, Non-GAAP Net Income and Non-GAAP Diluted Net Income Per Share to GAAP amounts.

Under the leadership of Morris Goldfarb, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Sammy Aaron, our Vice Chairman and President, and our dedicated team of executive officers, G-III has successfully operated in fashion markets that are intensely competitive. Our ability to continuously evaluate and respond to changing consumer demands and tastes, across multiple market segments, distribution channels and geographic areas, is critical to our success. This is demonstrated by our ability to reposition the Company and deliver strong results in fiscal 2024.

Our Board believes the relative performance of our Common Stock, as measured by Total Stockholder Return (TSR), is an important performance indicator. During fiscal 2024, our stock price increased by 75%, significantly outperforming the S&P Textiles, Apparel & Luxury Goods Industry Index, which declined approximately 14%, and our compensation peer group which declined by 4%.

Our TSR outperformed the S&P Textiles, Apparel & Luxury Goods Industry Index over the two, three and four-year periods ended on January 31, 2024. In addition, our TSR performance has generally exceeded the performance of our compensation peer group over these periods. We believe that our stockholders attribute this outperformance to the successful measures we have taken following the announcement of the planned termination of the Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger licenses, including by driving our owned brands across categories, continued development and expansion of our DKNY business and repositioning and expansion of our Donna Karan business, expanding our international business and increasing digital channel business opportunities and entering into important new license agreements.

4 \ Graphic

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PROXY SUMMARY

Graphic

We acquired the DKNY and Donna Karan brands, two of the most iconic American fashion brands, in December 2016. We initially repositioned and relaunched DKNY and we have successfully grown the brand. We are now focused on the repositioning and expansion of the Donna Karan brand with first deliveries made for Spring 2024. The new Donna Karan is a modern system of dressing created to appeal to a woman’s senses on every level, addressing her full lifestyle needs. Our Donna Karan product is currently being distributed in the United States through our diversified distribution network, including better department stores, digital channels and our own Donna Karan website. Donna Karan is widely considered to be a top fashion brand and is recognized as one of the most famous designer names in American fashion. We believe that the strength of the Donna Karan brand, along with our success with the DKNY brand, demonstrates the potential for our new Donna Karan products.

In March 2023, we entered into a long-term license with Authentic Brands Group for women’s apparel under the Nautica brand in North America. We plan to produce products under the Nautica brand across a number of categories starting with a full women’s jeanswear collection and then expanding in a phased approach into additional categories including sportswear, suit separates and dresses. The new five-year license agreement, effective as of January 2024, includes three extensions, for five years each. First deliveries began in January 2024. The product is expected to be distributed in North America through our diversified distribution network, including better department stores, digital channels and Nautica’s stores and website, as well as in franchised stores globally. We believe that significant opportunity exists in the better women’s apparel space in categories where we have strong expertise.

In May 2023, we entered into a global twenty-five year master license with Xcel Brands, Inc. to design and produce all categories of men’s and women’s product for the Halston brand. The agreement provides for an initial term of five years, followed by a twenty-year period, with G-III having the right to terminate every five years. We also have a purchase option for the Halston brand at the end of the twenty-five year term. First deliveries of Halston product are expected to begin in July 2024. Our Halston product is expected to be distributed globally through our diversified distribution network, including better department stores and digital channels. We believe that significant opportunity exists in the better women’s apparel space where G-III has significant expertise.

In September 2023, we entered into a license with HanesBrands Inc. to design and produce men’s and women’s outerwear collections for their Champion brand in North America. The agreement provides for an initial term of five years, effective as of January 2024, with a five year renewal option based on achieving certain sales targets. First deliveries of Champion product are expected for the Fall 2024 season. Our Champion product is expected to be distributed in North America through our diversified distribution network, including better department stores and digital channels. Our collections will feature

2024 PROXY STATEMENT / 5

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PROXY SUMMARY

quality heritage pieces that complement and enhance Champion’s principles. We believe this license aligns with G-III’s core competencies in outerwear and will fit seamlessly into our well-developed outerwear business.

We have been actively pursuing a number of near-term growth initiatives across our owned and licensed brands, as well as with respect to private label brands, including category, geographic and digital expansion. We are also directing resources toward new growth areas, including further leaning into building our own brands, broadening our European business, developing new licensing opportunities and continuing to acquire new businesses. Our team remains steadfast in its focus on executing our strategy for long-term value creation. We believe that our management team, led by Morris Goldfarb, our Chairman and CEO, and Sammy Aaron, our Vice Chairman and President, is best positioned to navigate these challenges and create the opportunity for significant shareholder value creation.

We are focused on the following strategic initiatives, which we believe are critical to our long-term success:

Drive our brands across categories: We are a partner of choice to a diversified retail network, supplying a broad range of over 20 apparel, accessory and footwear categories across our owned and licensed brands. Our data-driven approach prioritizes the consumer in all aspects of our business and enables us to create category lines that offer a compelling mix of products. We believe the potential of our brands will assist us in gaining new customers and expanding our product offerings. We have increased our focus on segmenting our portfolio of brands to grow our market share across our distribution channels. Additionally, we have added Nautica and Halston to our portfolio of licensed brands. We believe we can unlock the potential of these brands and expand them into a broad range of additional categories as we diversify their product offerings. We are also launching outerwear for Champion, a well-recognized brand across a wide consumer base.

Expanding our portfolio of owned brands: We own a portfolio of globally recognized brands including DKNY, Donna Karan, Karl Lagerfeld, Karl Lagerfeld Paris and Vilebrequin, among others. Owning our own brands is advantageous to us for several reasons:

oWe have full control of these brands and can distribute them globally across channels, including though our omni-channel retail and online retailers, through off-price channels and direct to the consumer through our stores and digital sites.
oWe can realize significantly higher operating margins as we do not pay licensing fees on sales of our proprietary products and can also generate additional licensing revenues (which have no related cost of goods sold) for categories of products we do not produce.
oWe are able to license our proprietary brands in new categories and geographies to carefully selected licensees.
oWe are able to build equity in these brands to benefit the long-term interests of our stockholders.

We believe we can expand our owned brands and their international reach. Our first full year of ownership of Karl Lagerfeld accelerated this growth. We are investing to increase the lifestyle appeal of our owned brands as we grow them organically. We are also expanding into new lifestyle categories and working with new distribution partners to grow into new geographies. We have experienced positive results in the performance in each of our owned brand’s key licensed product categories. We believe we have significant opportunities to increase the overall profitability of our owned brands.

We continue to explore strategic opportunities, including acquisitions and investments in brands and companies, as well as joint-ventures and licensing opportunities that we believe are additive to our overall business. We take a disciplined approach to any acquisitions, seeking brands with broad consumer recognition that we can grow profitably and expand by leveraging our infrastructure and core competencies.

Continue to develop and expand our DKNY business and re-position and expand the Donna Karan business: We believe that Donna Karan and DKNY are two of the most iconic and recognizable brands and we are well positioned to unlock their potential and expand the reach of these brands. We are leveraging our demonstrated ability to drive organic growth and develop talent within our Company to maximize the potential of the Donna Karan and DKNY brands. We began our relaunch of our Donna Karan brand in January 2024. The new Donna Karan is a modern system of dressing created to appeal to a woman’s senses on every level, addressing

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the lifestyle needs of a new consumer. Inspired by the Donna Karan archives, we have thoughtfully created a new product line that captures the brand’s ethos of timeless elegance, empowering women and accessible luxury, tailored to meet the lifestyle needs of today’s consumer. We supported this relaunch in several key ways:

oWe launched a highly visible marketing campaign to showcase timeless outfits that draw inspiration from popular past Donna Karan product lines.
oWe redesigned the Donna Karan website to engage consumers with the power of the brand.
oWith our fragrance partner, we launched our first-ever fragrance collection to compliment Donna Karan’s existing iconic fragrance offerings.

Our initial product offering is resonating with consumers. The excitement and attention created by this launch has generated momentum and we believe we can expand the brand globally over time.

DKNY merges modern tailoring with sophisticated ease, celebrating the aspirational and practical spirit of New York, with a highly differentiated perspective from Donna Karan. The brand has global distribution, including premier department stores and their digital sites, partner run stores and online retailers. We believe we have the opportunity to increase the international presence of the DKNY brand through elevating its wholesale profile and developing a digital footprint with Zalando and other key online retailers. We are launching a marketing initiative for DKNY to drive global brand awareness with a focus on the brand’s more youthful appeal.  

Expanding our international business: We continue to expand our international business and enter into new markets worldwide. In fiscal 2023, we acquired the remaining interests in the Karl Lagerfeld fashion brand which grew our European business and added new international expertise. In fiscal 2022, we purchased European luxury fashion brand Sonia Rykiel. We own Vilebrequin, a premier provider of status swimwear, resort wear and related accessories that was founded in Europe. We have created innovative experiences that allow consumers to experience Karl Lagerfeld and Vilebrequin by expanding these brands into the leisure industry, strengthening their global lifestyle appeal and extending their reach. We believe these brands can enable us to expand in the international space and that there is untapped potential for these brands. In addition, we believe that the international sales and profit opportunity is quite significant for our DKNY and Donna Karan businesses and, as a result, we are expanding our DKNY and Donna Karan businesses globally. Continued growth, brand development and marketing in overseas markets is critical to driving global brand recognition.

Increasing digital channel business opportunities: We are continuing to make changes to our business to address the additional challenges and opportunities created by the evolving role of the digital marketplace in the retail sector and expect to increase sales of our products in an omni-channel environment. We are investing in digital personnel, marketing, logistics, planning, distribution and other strategic opportunities to expand our digital footprint. Consumers are increasingly engaging with brands through digital channels, and we believe that this trend will continue to grow in the coming years. Our key brands serve as the anchor of our business and position us to be the direct beneficiaries of this trend. By continuing to leverage our partnerships with the digital channels operated by major retailers, online distributors and our licensors, as well as building out our own digital capabilities, we intend to facilitate brand awareness, increase consumer engagement and, ultimately, drive sales.

We maintain a strong financial position with over $1 billion of liquidity in cash and availability at fiscal year-end. We also repurchased $26.1 million of our common stock last year and, in August 2023, authorized an increase in the number of shares covered by our share repurchase program to an aggregate amount of 10,000,000 shares.

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Our Director Nominees

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The Board of Directors recommends that stockholders vote FOR Proposal No. 1 to elect thirteen directors to serve on our Board of Directors for the ensuing year. Alan Feller, a current director and Chairman of our Audit Committee, has decided not to stand for reelection at the Annual Meeting. After the Annual Meeting, it is expected that Michael Shaffer will be appointed as Chairman of the Audit Committee.

Our director nominees are listed below.

Name and

Primary Occupation

Age

Director
since

Independent

Committee and Board Roles

Audit

Compensation

Nominating &
Corporate
Governance

Morris Goldfarb Graphic

Chairman & CEO, G-III

73

1974

Sammy Aaron

Vice Chairman and President, G-III

64

2005

Thomas J. Brosig

Owner and Chief Financial Officer, McMurphy Homes, LLC

74

1992

Graphic

Graphic

Dr. Joyce F. Brown

President, Fashion Institute of Technology

77

2023

Graphic

Jeffrey Goldfarb

Executive Vice President, G-III

47

2009

Victor Herrero

Chief Executive Officer and Director, Lovisa Holdings, Ltd.

55

2019

Graphic

Robert L. Johnson

Founder and Chairman of The RLJ Companies, LLC and former Founder and Chairman of Black Entertainment Television (BET)

77

2020

Graphic

Patti H. Ongman

Independent Retail Consultant and Former Chief Merchandising Officer - Macy’s

68

2022

Graphic

Laura Pomerantz

Vice Chairman and Head of Strategic Accounts, Cushman & Wakefield

76

2005

Graphic

Michael Shaffer

Retired Executive Vice President, Chief Operating and Financial Officer, PVH Corp.

61

2023

Graphic

Graphic

Cheryl Vitali

Global President, L’Oréal’s American Luxury Brands

63

2011

Graphic

Richard White Graphic

CEO, Aeolus Capital Group LLC

70

2003

Graphic

Graphic

Graphic

Andrew Yaeger

Global Head of Strategic Equity Transactions Group, Jefferies Financial Group Inc.

46

2023

Graphic

Meetings in Fiscal 2024

8

4

2


Graphic Committee Chair

Member

Graphic Audit Committee Financial Expert

Graphic Chairman of the Board

Graphic Lead Independent Director

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Board of Directors Nominees Snapshot

The information in this section reflects the composition of the Board of Directors after the Annual Meeting. We have made substantial progress with respect to Board independence (from 67% to 77%), tenure (from 18 to 14.1 years) and diversity (3 women to 4 women and 17% to 31% ethnically diverse) over the past 4 years. While the Company does not have a formal policy with respect to the tenure of Board members, it strives to achieve a mix of experienced and newer directors as evidenced by the election of 6 new independent directors over the past 5 years. Our newer directors are mentored by our more experienced independent directors to foster the transfer of knowledge about us and the ability of our directors to work together in support of us.

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Skills and Experience

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Governance Highlights

G-III has established strong policies that follow best practices for corporate governance:

Graphic

Annual election of directors

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Robust stock ownership guidelines for executive officers and directors

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Experienced Lead Independent Director

Graphic

Anti-pledging and anti-hedging policies

Graphic

Regular executive sessions of independent directors

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Clawback policy for executive compensation in the event of financial restatements

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Board committees composed entirely of independent directors

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Established standards for director selection, independence and qualifications

Graphic

Extensive stockholder outreach led by our Lead Independent Director, with our CFO, Senior Vice President, Investor Relations and the Compensation Committee’s compensation consultant also participating, to obtain direct stockholder feedback

Graphic

Director resignation policy if a nominee to the Board of Directors fails to receive majority support

Graphic

Enhanced disclosure of environmental, social and governance initiatives

Graphic

Annual Say on Pay vote

Stockholder Outreach

G-III and its Board of Directors greatly value the opinions of our stockholders and have spent considerable time soliciting their views on a variety of topics, including executive compensation, our progress on board diversity and refreshment and our Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives. During prior years we have invited stockholders owning approximately 90% our Common Stock to engage. Each year, stockholders owning approximately 60% to 70% of our Common Stock chose to participate in engagement. For calendar year 2024, the holders of approximately 90% of our Common Stock were invited to engage with us and stockholders owning approximately 60% of our Common Stock participated in discussions with us.

Our stockholder outreach has been led by our Lead Independent Director, who is also Chairman of our Compensation Committee. Our Executive Vice President and Chief Growth and Operations Officer, our Chief Financial Officer, our Senior Vice President, Investor Relations and the Compensation Committee’s independent compensation consultant also participated in meetings with investors in 2024. During these meetings, we discussed (i) the new compensation arrangements for our Chairman and CEO and Vice Chairman and President, (II) our CSR efforts over the past year, (iii) Company and Board Diversity and (iv) Board refreshment.

Graphic More information on our stockholder outreach and our "say on pay” results last year and our response is provided beginning on page 31.

Corporate Social Responsibility

We invested significant time and resources furthering our key initiatives, developing programs and expanding our Corporate Social Responsibility (“CSR”) agenda. We have made important progress to reinforce our social and environmental standards as we continue to refine our oversight of our supply chain.

Engage Our People - In line with our entrepreneurial spirit, we have worked hard to advance our strategic priorities and build upon the success of fiscal 2023, skillfully navigating through another tough environment. We remain focused on fostering a stronger, more engaging workplace for our employees. We have invested in new HR systems to enhance our recruitment process and talent retention to ensure we bring in and keep best-in-class talent, and we have expanded our Lunch and Learn programs, led by our leadership team, to facilitate opportunities for continuous learning and development for our team.  

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We recognize the importance of ensuring the workers in our supply chain are treated fairly and our vendors are abiding by our Vendor Code of Conduct. Thus, we work closely with suppliers to develop and implement strategies that align with our social and environmental standards. We have also enhanced the effectiveness of our supplier audits through our continued participation in the Social & Labor Convergence Program, allowing us to reduce the number of audits for suppliers, lessening redundancies in shared audits and better assist factories to focus on addressing their most pressing issues.

Forced labor continues to be a point of focus across our industry, and we work closely with our supply chain partners to mitigate the risk of forced labor being used to make our products or raw materials utilized in our products. We have advanced our internal cotton traceability program through the implementation of annual Cotton Compliance Monitoring training sessions to educate our staff and factories about our requirements and procedures for ensuring the ethical sourcing of cotton. We are enhancing our program by working on ways to couple these traceability lessons with other materials in our products. We continue to explore ways other SaaS technologies might mitigate risks. We also continue to leverage the testing capabilities of ORITAINTM to trace materials back to their fiber origins to mitigate the risk that forced labor is used in our supply chain. We routinely engage with counsel and industry organizations with respect to regulatory developments to ensure our practices and procedures are aligning with the continually developing regulatory landscape, and we remain committed to ensuring proper treatment for everyone who works in our supply chain.

Protect Our Environment - We continue to work towards reducing the environmental impact of our own operations and that of our entire supply chain by enacting sustainable fashion practices and working closely with our supply chain partners.

This year also marked our second year as a part of the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (“SAC”) as we continue to collaborate with others in the industry to strengthen our social and environmental programs and improve vendor performance. We are implementing the SAC’s Higg Facility Environmental Module across our Tier 1 and 2 supplier factories, providing us with greater insight into their environmental impact and allowing us to identify opportunities for further improvement.  

We are making progress on our goal to transition our synthetic materials to 100% recycled sources by 2030. We are also working to increase the use of recycled, organic, and natural fibers, and we are introducing recycled synthetic fibers certified by the Global Recycled Standard or the Recycled Claim Standard into a growing number of our products. Notably, in 2023, Vilebrequin, our premier European swimwear brand, manufactured over 80% of its products from preferred materials which consistently deliver reduced impacts and increased environmental benefits.

Over the past year we have furthered our work with our sustainability consultants and are collecting Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions data from across our Company to better understand our GHG emissions. Once we have established our baseline, we will work to implement best practices to reduce our environmental impact. We are also focused on collecting our Scope 3 data and are developing our long-term sustainability strategy.

Invest in Our Communities – Consistent with our longstanding commitment to philanthropy, we have continued to maximize opportunities with our charitable partners, including Ronald McDonald House, Women in Need (“WIN”), Delivering Good, Hetrick Martin Institute and City Harvest. We have developed an internal associate committee so our employees can actively engage in developing and executing charitable initiatives across our organization.

We have a solid foundation in place, which we continue to build upon as we build our new Corporate Sustainability Strategy centered around our core CSR principles: Engage Our People, Protect Our Environment and Invest in Our Community.

The Board of Directors has responsibility for our CSR efforts and continues to consider establishing a separate Board committee that would oversee our CSR efforts.

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Human Capital

Our People

As of January 31, 2024, we employed approximately 3,500 persons on a full-time basis and approximately 1,100 on a part-time basis. We employ both union and non-union personnel and believe that our relations with our employees are good. We have not experienced any interruption of our operations due to a labor disagreement with our employees.

We are an Equal Opportunity Employer with policies, procedures and practices that recognize the value and worth of each individual, covering matters such as safety, training, advancement, discrimination, harassment and retaliation. We provide training on important issues to our personnel. G-III ensures compliance with labor and employment law issues through a variety of processes and procedures, using both internal and external expertise and resources. We continue to work towards achieving a stronger, more engaging workplace coupled with a foundation for enhancing the employee experience by continuing to promote our passion for our product, pride in our partnerships, our accountability and our entrepreneurial spirit.

We are committed to providing a healthy work environment that allows employees to feel highly valued, productive and effective within their jobs by maintaining an inclusive environment which we believe positively impacts employee engagement. Our employees are the heart of our organization and our ongoing emphasis to recruit and retain the best talent in our industry continues as a top priority. We are constantly striving to build upon and improve our talent acquisition and selection processes, onboarding experience and training initiatives.

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

We are a diverse workplace and know that, to succeed, we must become an even more diverse, equitable and inclusive organization. Currently, approximately 60% of our leadership team and 72% of our overall workforce self-identify as women, and 48% of our overall workforce identify as Black, Indigenous and People of Color (“BIPOC”). Of our fourteen Board members, there are four women and four people of diverse backgrounds, exceeding NASDAQ requirements for board diversity. We recognize that insights and ideas from a diverse range of backgrounds will better position us for the future and continue to work towards increasing Board diversity.

Our commitment to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion also extends outside of our business. We are a founding member of the groundbreaking Social Justice Center at the Fashion Institute of Technology (“FIT”), a premier fashion university, whose purpose is to help establish a program that is intended to increase opportunities and accelerate social equity for BIPOC persons entering our industry for years to come. Additionally, we continued our partnership with UNCF (“United Negro College Fund”) by sponsoring two enriching and rewarding student internships. These interns were provided room and board at FIT. They participated in a program that consisted of educational master class sessions and experienced New York theatre and other local programs. In addition, we funded two scholarships through UNCF. In fiscal 2025, we will continue to support our diversity efforts by working directly with Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing two students the opportunity to gain firsthand experience working at G-III.

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion are at the heart of G-III’s values. We strive to create a workplace with opportunities for all. We have made progress and intend to continue to do so in the coming years.

Talent Acquisition, Development and Retention

Having the right talent in the organization is one of the most critical aspects of our business. This year our HR team focused on hiring, developing and retaining talent. After a successful launch of our Lunch and Learn program facilitated by our leadership team, we have continued the program by offering a second semester of courses that will provided an opportunity for continuous learning about our business. We have procured a training solution program that will incorporate a G-III Master Class training library that will make these sessions and other educational tools accessible to our employees.

Through our aggressive recruiting, we have been able to bring in best-in-class talent. We had several key hires at the Company, including our Chief Growth and Operations Officer, Dana Perlman, who has significant industry experience through her over 20-year career in apparel, strategy and finance.

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Compensation, Benefits, Safety and Wellness

We firmly believe our comprehensive benefit programs are an integral part of our talent acquisition, retention and overall employee experience. We continually evaluate and benchmark our programs to ensure they remain competitive, on-trend and meet compliance. Our fiscal 2025 goals include enhancing our employee education on the value of our benefit programs. We successfully re-introduced our onsite Benefits and Health Fair for corporate employees for the first time since the pandemic. In addition to our benefit programs, we annually recognize the tenure of our employees with service awards and celebrated 98 employees with service of 10, 20, 25, 30, and 35 years. We look forward to continuing this longstanding G-III tradition.

Executive Compensation Highlights

In fiscal 2024, our Compensation Committee completed negotiations with respect to amending the employment agreements with Morris Goldfarb, our Chairman and CEO, and Sammy Aaron, our Vice Chairman and President. These negotiations resulted in each of Mr. Goldfarb and Mr. Aaron voluntarily entering into new employment agreements that significantly modified compensation arrangements with new provisions that align with market norms and are majority performance-based. The new compensation arrangements with each of our Chairman and CEO and our Vice Chairman and President significantly reduced the size of annual cash incentives awards to each executive, included hard dollar caps on these awards and reflect a greater weighting for long-term equity to better align with market practices and incentivize long-term performance, shareholder value creation and retention. The new compensation arrangements with each of Mr. Goldfarb and Mr. Aaron are described below under “New Compensation Arrangement for Our Chairman and CEO” and “New Compensation Arrangement for Our Vice Chairman and President.”

The Board believes that the continued leadership of our Chairman and CEO and our Vice Chairman and President was one of its highest priorities, given the challenges created by the long-term loss of the licenses for Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger products and the strategic pivot required for the Company to address the effects of the long-term loss of these licenses.

In fiscal 2024, approximately 92% of the compensation of our Chairman and CEO and our Vice Chairman and President and 79% of the average compensation of our other NEOs consisted of at-risk annual and long-term incentive compensation.

Chairman and CEO and Vice Chairman and President Compensation Mix (1)

Other NEOs Compensation Mix

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Note (1): Excludes the inducement awards under the new employment agreements with each of Morris Goldfarb and Sammy Aaron. See “Compensation Discussion and Analysis-Inducement Awards for Our Chairman and CEO and Our Vice Chairman and President” for a discussion of these inducement awards.

Graphic

Based on the information in this “Proxy Summary,” as well as the more detailed information contained in the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis,” our Board and our Compensation Committee strongly believe that our stockholders should vote FOR Proposal No. 2—Advisory Vote on Compensation of our Named Executive Officers, commonly known as the “Say on Pay” proposal.

Graphic More information is provided in the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” beginning on page 28 and the “Executive Compensation Tables” beginning on page 44.

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BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP OF COMMON STOCK BY CERTAIN STOCKHOLDERS AND MANAGEMENT

The following table sets forth information as of April 26, 2024 (except as otherwise noted in the footnotes) regarding the beneficial ownership of our Common Stock of: (i) each director; (ii) each person known by us to own beneficially more than five percent of our outstanding Common Stock; (iii) each executive officer named in the Fiscal 2024 Summary Compensation Table; and (iv) all directors and executive officers as a group. Alan Feller, a current director of the Company, has decided not to stand for reelection at the Annual Meeting. Except as otherwise specified, the named beneficial owner has the sole voting and investment power over the shares listed. The percentage of ownership is based on 44,965,287 shares of Common Stock outstanding (excluding treasury shares) as of April 26, 2024 (except as otherwise noted in the footnotes). Unless otherwise indicated in the table below, each beneficial owner has an address in care of our principal executive offices at 512 Seventh Avenue, New York, New York 10018.

    

Amount and Nature of

    

 

Beneficial Ownership of

Percentage of

 

Name and Address of Beneficial Owner

Common Stock

Common Stock

 

Morris Goldfarb

 

4,575,163

(1)

10.2%

Sammy Aaron

 

118,310

(2)

*

Thomas J. Brosig

 

43,935

(3)

*

Dr. Joyce F. Brown

 

6,407

(4)

*

Alan Feller

 

29,357

(5)

*

Jeffrey Goldfarb

 

488,153

(6)

1.1%

Victor Herrero

37,197

(7)

*

Robert L. Johnson

19,903

(8)

*

Patti H. Ongman

 

9,798

(9)

*

Laura Pomerantz

13,471

(10)

*

Michael Shaffer

 

6,407

(11)

*

Cheryl Vitali

 

54,399

(12)

*

Richard White

 

111,218

(13)

*

Andrew Yaeger

6,407

(14)

*

BlackRock, Inc.

 

55 East 52nd Street

New York, NY 10055

7,351,375

(15)

16.3%

The Vanguard Group

 

100 Vanguard Blvd.

Malvern, PA 19355

4,754,135

(16)

10.6%

Dimensional Fund Advisors LP

 

Building One

6300 Bee Cave Road

Austin, Texas 78746

2,777,980

(17)

6.2%

Neal S. Nackman

 

34,833

(18)

*

Dana Perlman

All directors and executive officers as a group (16 persons)

 

5,554,958

(19)

12.4%

*     Less than one percent

(1)Includes (i) 166,750 shares of Common Stock held by Goldfarb Family Partners, L.L.C., of which Mr. Goldfarb is the sole Manager; (ii) 76,175 shares of Common Stock owned by The Morris and Arlene Goldfarb Family Foundation, Inc., of which Mr. Goldfarb is the President and Treasurer; (iii) 3,191,706 shares of Common Stock owned jointly by Mr. Goldfarb and his wife, Arlene Goldfarb; (iv) 29,666 shares of Common Stock owned by Arlene Goldfarb; (v) 200,000 shares of Common Stock held by The Morris Goldfarb 2012 Delaware Trust (Mr. Goldfarb serves as a member of the Trust Committee of the Trust, which directs the Trustee’s decisions as to voting and disposition of the shares held in the Trust) and (vi) 200,000 shares of Common Stock held by The Arlene Goldfarb 2012 Delaware Trust (Arlene Goldfarb serves as a member of the Trust Committee of the Trust, which directs the Trustee’s decisions as to voting and disposition of the shares held in the Trust). In addition to the shares listed in the table, Mr. Goldfarb has the right to receive (i) an aggregate of 187,513 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of required time vesting periods; and (ii) an aggregate of 1,124,490 shares of Common Stock pursuant to PSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of performance conditions and required time vesting periods. The number of shares earned pursuant to PSU awards could increase or decrease depending upon actual performance achieved relative to performance targets.

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(2)In addition to the shares listed in the table, Mr. Aaron has the right to receive (i) an aggregate of 149,316 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of required time vesting periods; and (ii) an aggregate of 276,046 shares of Common Stock pursuant to PSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of performance conditions and required time vesting periods. The number of shares earned pursuant to PSU awards could increase or decrease depending upon actual performance achieved relative to performance targets.

(3)Includes 12,080 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, which will vest within 60 days of April 26, 2024. In addition to the shares listed in the table, Mr. Brosig has the right to receive an aggregate of 1,890 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of required time vesting periods.

(4)Includes 6,407 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, which will vest within 60 days of April 26, 2024.

(5)Includes 12,934 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, which will vest within 60 days of April 26, 2024.

(6)Includes (i) 70,663 shares of Common Stock held by Jeffrey and Stacey Goldfarb, Mr. Goldfarb’s wife, as joint tenants; (ii) 47,170 shares of Common Stock owned by JARS Portfolio LLC; (iii) 24,896 shares of Common Stock owned by the Amanda Julie Goldfarb Trust 2007 of which Mr. Goldfarb and his wife are co-trustees; and (iv) 2,200 shares of Common Stock owned by the Ryan Gabriel Goldfarb Trust 2009 of which Mr. Goldfarb and his wife are co-trustees. In addition to the shares listed in the table, Mr. Goldfarb has the right to receive (i) an aggregate of 91,583 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of required time vesting periods; and (ii) an aggregate of 103,736 shares of Common Stock pursuant to PSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of performance conditions and required time vesting periods. The number of shares earned pursuant to PSU awards could increase or decrease depending upon actual performance achieved relative to performance targets.

(7)Includes 9,104 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, which will vest within 60 days of April 26, 2024. In addition to the shares listed in the table, Mr. Herrero has the right to receive an aggregate of 1,695 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of required time vesting periods.

(8)Includes 9,104 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, which will vest within 60 days of April 26, 2024. In addition to the shares listed in the table, Mr. Johnson has the right to receive an aggregate of 1,695 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of required time vesting periods.

(9)Includes 8,102 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, which will vest within 60 days of April 26, 2024. In addition to the shares listed in the table, Ms. Ongman has the right to receive an aggregate of 1,695 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of required time vesting periods.

(10)Includes 9,104 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, which will vest within 60 days of April 26, 2024. In addition to the shares listed in the table, Ms. Pomerantz has the right to receive an aggregate of 1,695 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of required time vesting periods.

(11)Includes 6,407 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, which will vest within 60 days of April 26, 2024.

(12)Includes 9,104 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, which will vest within 60 days of April 26, 2024. In addition to the shares listed in the table, Ms. Vitali has the right to receive an aggregate of 1,695 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of required time vesting periods.

(13)Includes (i) Includes 12,722 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, which will vest within 60 days of April 26, 2024, (ii) 1,268 shares of Common Stock owned by the Elizabeth White Grantor Trust, of which Mr. White is the trustee and over which he has investment control and (iii) 1,268 shares of Common Stock owned by the Alexandra White Grantor Trust, of which Mr. White is the trustee and over which he has investment control. In addition to the shares listed in the table, Mr. White has the right to receive an aggregate of 2,347 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of required time vesting periods.

(14)Includes 6,407 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, which will vest within 60 days of April 26, 2024.

(15)Information is derived from the Schedule 13G/A filed by BlackRock, Inc. (“BlackRock”) with the Securities and Exchange Commission on January 22, 2024. BlackRock is a parent holding company or control person in accordance with Exchange Act Rule 13d-1(b)(1)(ii)(G) and reported sole voting power with respect to 7,116,435 of such shares and sole dispositive power with respect to 7,351,375 of such shares. The filing reported that such shares are beneficially owned by several BlackRock subsidiaries.

(16)Information is derived from the Schedule 13G/A filed by The Vanguard Group, Inc. (“Vanguard”) with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 13, 2024. Vanguard is an investment adviser in accordance with Exchange Act Rule 13d-1(b)(1)(ii)(E) and reported shared voting power with respect to 63,934 of such shares, sole dispositive power with respect to 4,649,624 of such shares and shared dispositive power with respect to 104,511 of such shares.

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(17)Information is derived from the Schedule 13G/A filed by Dimensional Fund Advisors LP (“DFA”) with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 9, 2024. DFA is an investment advisor in accordance with Exchange Act Rule 13d-1(b)(1)(ii)(E) and reported sole voting power with respect to 2,724,004 of such shares and sole dispositive power with respect to 2,777,980 of such shares. The filing reported that DFA is an investment adviser registered under Section 203 of the Investment Advisors Act of 1940, furnishes investment advice to four investment companies registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, and serves as investment manager or sub-adviser to certain other commingled funds, group trusts and separate accounts (such investment companies, trusts and accounts, collectively referred to as the “Funds”), and that all securities reported in the filing are owned by the Funds.

(18)In addition to the shares listed in the table, Mr. Nackman has the right to receive (i) an aggregate of 30,237 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of required time vesting periods; and (ii) an aggregate of 30.237 shares of Common Stock pursuant to PSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of performance conditions and required time vesting periods. The number of shares earned pursuant to PSU awards could increase or decrease depending upon actual performance achieved relative to performance targets.

(19)Includes 99,585 shares of Common Stock pursuant to RSU awards, which will vest within 60 days of April 26, 2024. In addition to the shares listed in the table, all directors and officers as a group have the right to receive (i) an aggregate of 480,851 shares pursuant to RSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of required time vesting periods; and (ii) an aggregate of 1,534,509 shares of Common Stock pursuant to PSU awards, subject to the satisfaction of performance conditions and required time vesting periods. The number of shares earned pursuant to PSU awards could increase or decrease depending upon actual performance achieved relative to performance targets.

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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Board of Directors

The Board of Directors has determined that Thomas J. Brosig, Dr. Joyce F. Brown, Victor Herrero, Robert L. Johnson, Patti H. Ongman, Laura Pomerantz, Michael Shaffer, Cheryl Vitali, Andrew Yaeger and Richard White are independent directors. Alan Feller, who is not standing for reelection, was also determined to be an independent director. Assuming all of the nominated persons are elected as directors at the Annual Meeting, the independent directors will constitute 77% of the Board of Directors. In making its determination regarding the independence of the directors, the Board relied upon information provided by each of the directors and noted that each independent director meets the standards for independence set out in Nasdaq Listing Rule 5605(a)(2) and under the applicable rules and regulations of the SEC, and that there is no material business relationship between G-III and any independent director, including any business entity with which any independent director is affiliated.

The Board of Directors held four meetings and acted by unanimous written consent seven times during the fiscal year ended January 31, 2024. During the fiscal year ended January 31, 2024, each director attended at least 75% of the meetings of the Board of Directors and committees of the Board on which he or she served. We do not have a formal policy regarding attendance by members of the Board of Directors at annual stockholders’ meetings. All of our directors attended the 2023 Annual Meeting of Stockholders.

Our Board of Directors has an Audit Committee, Compensation Committee and Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. Each member of our Audit, Compensation and Nominating and Corporate Governance Committees has been determined by the Board of Directors to be “independent” within the meaning of Nasdaq Listing Rule 5605(a)(2). Each member of the Audit Committee is “independent” within the meaning of Nasdaq Listing Rule 5605(c)(2)(A) and under the applicable rules and regulations of the SEC regarding the independence of audit committee members. Each member of the Compensation Committee is “independent” within the meaning of Nasdaq Listing Rule 5605(d)(2)(A).

AUDIT COMMITTEE

Meetings during the fiscal year ended January 31, 2024:

8

    Alan Feller GraphicGraphic

    Victor Herrero

    Michael Shaffer Graphic

    Richard White Graphic

Responsibilities

The Audit Committee is responsible for, among other things:

Assisting the Board in monitoring:

(i)

the integrity of our financial statements,

(ii)

the qualifications and independence of our independent auditors,

(iii)

the performance of our internal audit function and independent auditors, and

(iv)

the compliance by us with legal and regulatory requirements.

The appointment, compensation and oversight of the work of G-III’s independent registered public accounting firm.

Graphic ALL MEMBERS OF THE AUDIT COMMITTEE ARE INDEPENDENT.

Qualifications

Graphic The Board has determined that each of Messrs. Feller, Shaffer and White is an audit committee financial expert as such term is defined in the rules of the SEC. Alan Feller, the Chairman of the Audit Committee, has decided not to stand for reelection at the Annual Meeting. Assuming his election as a director at the Annual Meeting, it is expected that Michael Shaffer will be appointed Chairman of the Audit Committee after the Annual Meeting.

Charter

A copy of the Audit Committee’s charter is available in the “Investors” section of our website at http://www.giii.com.

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COMPENSATION COMMITTEE

Meetings during the fiscal year ended January 31, 2024:

4

    Richard White Graphic

    Thomas J. Brosig

Patti H. Ongman

    Laura Pomerantz

Responsibilities

The Compensation Committee discharges the responsibilities of the Board relating to compensation of G-III’s directors and executive officers. The Committee has overall responsibility for approving and evaluating director and executive officer compensation plans, policies and programs of G-III, including establishing and monitoring the basic philosophy and policies governing the compensation of G-III’s directors and officers.

The Compensation Committee is responsible for reviewing and discussing with management, and recommending to the Board the inclusion of the Compensation Discussion and Analysis in our annual Proxy Statement.

GraphicALL MEMBERS OF THE COMPENSATION COMMITTEE ARE INDEPENDENT.

Specific duties and responsibilities of the Committee include, but are not limited to:

(i)

reviewing and approving the corporate goals and objectives relevant to the compensation of our executive officers and evaluating their performance in light of those corporate goals and objectives;

(ii)

recommending the compensation of our executive officers, giving consideration to the results of our most recent “Say on Pay” vote;

(iii)

reviewing and recommending adoption, amendment and termination of employment agreements and severance arrangements or plans for our executive officers;

(iv)

reviewing and recommending changes to director compensation;

(v)

reviewing and recommending adoption, amendment and termination of incentive compensation plans, equity-based plans and other compensation and benefit plans for directors or officers, giving consideration to the results of our most recent “Say on Pay” vote in considering plans for executive officers;

(vi)

administering G-III’s stock-based compensation, incentive and benefit plans; and

(vii)

administering, interpreting and carrying out our Stock Ownership Guidelines for directors and executive officers and Executive Incentive Compensation Recoupment Policy for executive officers.

The Compensation Committee also may form and delegate authority to any subcommittee comprised solely of its members who are independent so long as such formation and delegation comply with applicable law and the Nasdaq Listing Rules.

The Compensation Committee met four times and acted by unanimous written consent five times during the year ended January 31, 2024.

Charter

A copy of the Compensation Committee’s charter is available in the “Investors” section of our website at http://www.giii.com.

COMPENSATION COMMITTEE INTERLOCKS AND INSIDER PARTICIPATION

During the year ended January 31, 2024, Thomas J. Brosig, Patti H. Ongman, Laura Pomerantz and Richard White served on our Compensation Committee. None of the members of the Compensation Committee (i) has ever been an officer or employee of ours (other than Mr. Brosig, who briefly served as our Executive Vice President during the time of our initial public offering in 1989) or (ii) has any relationship requiring disclosure by us under Item 404 of Regulation S-K. None of our executive officers served on the board or compensation committee (or other committee serving an equivalent function) of any other entity, where an executive officer of the other entity served on our Board of Directors or Compensation Committee.

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NOMINATING AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE

Meetings during the fiscal year ended January 31, 2024:

2

    Thomas J. Brosig Graphic

    Robert L. Johnson

    Cheryl Vitali

    Richard White

GraphicALL MEMBERS OF THE NOMINATING AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE ARE INDEPENDENT.

Responsibilities

The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee:

(a)

assists the Board in its selection of individuals

(i)

as nominees for election to the Board at G-III’s annual meeting of the stockholders or

(ii)

to fill any vacancies or newly created directorships on the Board and

(b)

developing and maintaining G-III’s corporate governance policies, and any related matters required by the federal securities laws.

The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee is also responsible for a number of matters under our Director Selection and Qualification Standards and Resignation Policy as described below. The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee met to review the performance and the experience, qualifications, attributes and skills of the members of the Board and recommended to our Board the persons to be nominated for election as directors at the Annual Meeting.

Charter

A copy of the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee’s charter is available in the “Investors” section of our website at http://www.giii.com.

NOMINATIONS PROCESS

It is the policy of the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee to consider candidates for Board membership suggested by Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee members and other Board members, management, our stockholders, third-party search firms and any other appropriate sources. As a stockholder, you may recommend any person for consideration as a nominee for director by writing to the Secretary of G-III, c/o G-III Apparel Group, Ltd., 512 Seventh Avenue, New York, New York 10018. Recommendations must be received by March 20, 2025 to be considered for the 2025 Annual Meeting of Stockholders. Recommendations must include the name and address of the stockholder making the recommendation, a representation setting forth the number of shares of our Common Stock beneficially owned by the recommending stockholder, a statement that the recommended nominee has expressed his or her intent to serve on the Board if elected, biographical information about the recommended nominee, any other information the stockholder believes would be helpful to the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee in evaluating the individual recommended nominee and a description of all arrangements or understandings between the recommending stockholder and each nominee and any other person concerning the nomination. The dissident stockholder should comply with the additional requirements of a proper notice under Rule 14a-19, which includes the statement that a dissident using the universal proxy rule intends to solicit 67% of the outstanding voting shares entitled to vote on the election of directors. You are also advised to review our Bylaws, which contain detailed requirements about advance notice of stockholder proposals and director nominations.

Under the Director Selection and Qualification Standards and Resignation Policy (the “Director Policy”), the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee is responsible for (i) assisting the Board in evaluating the independence of directors, (ii) developing and revising, as appropriate, for approval by the Board, selection criteria and qualification standards for Board nominees, (iii) identifying individuals believed to be qualified to become Board members consistent with criteria approved by the Board and applicable law and regulations, (iv) recommending candidates or nominees to the Board and (v) recommending to the Board whether or not to accept the resignation of a nominee for Director in an uncontested election who receives more votes “withheld” from his or her election than votes “for” such election.

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In evaluating candidates, the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee considers the following criteria:

●    personal integrity,

●    the extent to which a candidate would be a desirable addition to the Board and any committees of the Board,

●    skill,

●    independence (as that term is defined under the rules of the SEC and the Nasdaq Listing Rules),

●    sound business judgment,

●    the requirement to maintain a Board that is composed of a majority of independent directors,

●    diversity,

●    potential conflicts of interest,

●    business and professional skills and experience,

●    the extent to which a candidate would fill a present need and

●    experience with businesses and other organizations of comparable size,

●    concern for the long-term interests of stockholders.

●    the interplay of the candidate’s experience with the experience of other Board members,

In any particular situation, the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee may focus on persons possessing a particular background, experience or qualifications that the Committee believes would be important to enhance the effectiveness of the Board.

Although the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee does not have a formal policy with respect to considering diversity in identifying director nominees, it believes that a diverse Board is of benefit to the Company and, based on the expected composition of the Board after the Annual Meeting, in the past four years the percentage of our directors who are ethnically diverse has increased from 17% to 31%. The Board and the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee believe it is important that the Board members represent diverse viewpoints and a variety of skills so that, as a group, the Board will possess the appropriate talent, skills and expertise to oversee our business. The evaluation process for stockholder recommendations is the same as for candidates recommended from any other source. The needs of the Board and the factors that the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee consider in evaluating candidates are reassessed on an annual basis, when the Committee’s charter is reviewed.    

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BOARD DIVERSITY

Nasdaq listing rules require all Nasdaq listed companies to disclose diversity statistics regarding their boards of directors. The rules also require most Nasdaq listed companies to have, or explain why they do not have, at least two diverse directors, including one who self-identifies as female and one who self-identifies as either an under-represented minority or LGBTQ+. The Company is in compliance with Nasdaq’s diversity requirement.

In identifying and evaluating candidates for the Board, the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee considers the diversity of the Board, including diversity of skills, experience and backgrounds.

Based on the composition of the Board after the Annual Meeting, the Board Diversity Matrix below presents the Board’s diversity statistics in the format prescribed by the Nasdaq rules.

Board Diversity Matrix

Total Number of Directors

13

Female

Male

Non-Binary

Did Not Disclose Gender

Part I: Gender Identity

Directors

4

9

-

-

Part II: Demographic Background

African American or Black

1

1

-

-

Alaskan Native or Native American

1

-

-

-

Asian

-

-

-

-

Hispanic or Latinx

-

1

-

-

Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

-

-

-

-

White

3

7

-

-

Two or More Races or Ethnicities

1

-

-

-

LGBTQ+

-

Did Not Disclose Demographic Background

-

Stockholder Communications

The Board of Directors has provided a process for stockholders to send communications to the Board. Stockholders who wish to send communications to the Board of Directors, or any particular director, should address such communications to the Board or such director c/o G-III Apparel Group, Ltd., 512 Seventh Avenue, New York, New York 10018, Attn: Secretary. All such communications should include a representation from the submitting stockholder setting forth the stockholder’s address and the number of shares of our Common Stock beneficially owned by the stockholder. The Board will give appropriate attention to written communications on issues that are submitted by stockholders and will respond as appropriate. Absent unusual circumstances, the Secretary of G-III will (i) be primarily responsible for monitoring communications from stockholders and (ii) provide copies or summaries of such communications to the Board, the Lead Independent Director (who serves as a non-management resource for stockholders seeking to communicate with our Board) or the director to whom such communication is addressed, as the Secretary considers appropriate. Each stockholder communication will be forwarded to all directors, the Lead Independent Director or the director to whom it is addressed, if it relates to a substantive matter and includes suggestions or comments that the Secretary considers to be important for the directors, or director, to know. In general, stockholder communications relating to corporate governance and long-term corporate strategy are more likely to be forwarded than stockholder communications relating to personal grievances and matters as to which we may receive repetitive or duplicative communications.

Additionally, G-III’s by-laws set forth “advance notice” requirements for stockholders’ meetings consistent with the purpose of establishing an orderly process for stockholders seeking to nominate directors or propose business at stockholder

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meetings. The advance notice provisions in the by-laws require stockholders to deliver notice to G-III of their intention to make director nominations or bring other business before the meeting not later than the close of business on the 90th day, nor earlier than the close of business on the 120th day, in advance of the anniversary of the previous year’s annual meeting if the meeting is to be held on a day which is not more than 30 days in advance of the anniversary of the previous year’s annual meeting or not later than 70 days after the anniversary of the previous year’s annual meeting. The advance notice provisions of the by-laws prescribe information that the stockholder’s notice must contain, both as to itself and its proposed director nominee, if the stockholder wishes to nominate a candidate for the annual meeting director election, prescribe information that the stockholder’s notice must contain if the stockholder wishes to bring business other than a director nomination before the annual meeting, and set forth rules and procedures relating to special meetings of stockholders.

Risk Oversight

The risk oversight function of our Board of Directors is carried out by both the Board and the Audit Committee. A fundamental part of risk oversight is not only understanding the material risks a company faces and the steps management is taking to manage those risks, but also understanding what level of risk is appropriate for the company. The Board focuses on our general risk management strategy and the most significant risks facing us and ensures that management implements appropriate risk mitigation strategies. Management also apprises the Board of particular risk management matters in connection with its general oversight and approval of corporate matters.

While the full Board has overall responsibility for risk oversight, the Board has delegated oversight related to certain risks to the Audit Committee. The Audit Committee is responsible for reviewing and discussing with management our major and emerging risk exposures, including financial, operational, technology, privacy, data security, disaster recovery and ethics and compliance. The Audit Committee meets periodically with management and our internal audit department to discuss our major financial and operating risks and the steps, guidelines and policies management and our internal audit team have taken to monitor and control exposures to risk, including G-III’s risk assessment and risk management policies. The Chair of the Audit Committee regularly reports to the Board the substance of such reviews and discussions. Both the Board and the Audit Committee regularly review cybersecurity and data privacy risk matters.

Our Compensation Committee incorporates considerations of risk into its deliberations of our executive compensation program. The Compensation Committee believes that G-III’s compensation policies and practices do not create risks that are reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on G-III. In addition, our internal disclosure committee reviews with management the “risk factors” that appear in our Annual Report on Form 10-K prior to its filing with the SEC, as well as prior to the filing of our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q.

Our management is responsible for day-to-day risk management. Our risk management and internal audit areas serve as the primary monitoring and testing function for company-wide policies and procedures and manage the day-to-day oversight of the risk management strategy for our ongoing business. This oversight includes identifying, evaluating, and addressing potential risks that may exist at the enterprise, strategic, financial, operational, and compliance and reporting levels. The Board encourages management to promote a corporate culture that incorporates risk management into our corporate strategy and day-to-day business operations. The Board continually works, with input from our executive officers, to assess and analyze the most likely areas of future risk for us and our business.

Leadership Structure of the Board

The Board of Directors believes that Morris Goldfarb’s service in the dual roles of Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer is in our best interest, as well as the best interest of our stockholders. Mr. Goldfarb is the director most familiar with our business and industry and possesses detailed and in-depth knowledge of the issues, opportunities and challenges facing us and our business. Thus, he is in the best position to develop agendas and plans that ensure that the Board’s time and attention are focused on the most critical matters. We believe that Mr. Goldfarb is viewed by our customers, suppliers, business partners, investors and other stakeholders as providing strong leadership for our company in the marketplace and in our industry. This approach is often utilized by other public companies in the United States and we believe it has been effective for our company as well.

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Although the Board believes that the combination of the Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer roles is appropriate for us in the current circumstances, our Board does not have a specific policy as to whether or not these roles should be combined or separated.

LEAD INDEPENDENT DIRECTOR

In order to promote independent leadership on our Board and help ensure that the Board operates in a cohesive manner, the Board established the position of Lead Independent Director and elected Richard White as the Lead Independent Director. The responsibilities of the Lead Independent Director include:

(i)advising the Chairman of the Board on Board meeting agendas and materials sent to the Board;
(ii)serving as a liaison between non-management directors and the Chairman of the Board;
(iii)calling and presiding over executive sessions of the non-management directors;
(iv)presiding over Board meetings in the absence of the Chairman of the Board;
(v)serving as a non-management resource for stockholders and other external constituencies seeking to communicate with our Board;
(vi)oversight of the Board’s annual assessment of the performance of our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer; and
(vii)oversight of the Board’s annual self-assessment of its own performance, along with the Chairman of the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee.

In recent years, our stockholder outreach program has been led by our Lead Independent Director. Along with certain members of management, Mr. White has been at the forefront of communicating to our significant stockholders updates on corporate strategy, governance matters, including diversity and Board composition, and compensation programs as well as responding to their questions and concerns.

Additional Corporate Governance Policies

We also maintain the following corporate governance policies:

CODE OF ETHICS AND CONDUCT

All of our employees and employees of our subsidiaries (“Company Personnel”), officers and directors must adhere to our Code of Ethics and Conduct. It codifies those standards that we believe are reasonably designed to deter wrong-doing and to promote, among other things, adherence to the following principles:

(i)honest and ethical conduct, including the ethical handling of actual or apparent conflicts of interest between personal and professional relationships;
(ii)full, fair, accurate, timely and understandable disclosure in reports and documents that we file with, or submit to, the SEC and in other public communications made by G-III;
(iii)compliance with applicable governmental laws, rules and regulations;
(iv)the prompt internal reporting of violations of the Code of Ethics and Conduct; and
(v)accountability for adherence to the Code of Ethics and Conduct.

A copy of the Code of Ethics and Conduct is available in the “Investors” section of our website at http://www.giii.com.

WHISTLEBLOWER POLICY

The Whistleblower Policy protects all of our Company Personnel, officers and directors if they raise concerns regarding G-III, such as concerns regarding incorrect financial reporting including questionable accounting, internal controls or auditing matters; unlawful activities; activities that are not in line with G-III policies, including the Code of Ethics and Conduct; or activities which otherwise amount to serious improper conduct. A copy of the Whistleblower Policy is available in the “Investors” section of our website at http://www.giii.com.

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INSIDER TRADING, HEDGING AND PLEDGING POLICY

The Insider Trading, Hedging and Pledging Policy (the “Trading Policy”) applies to all of our Company Personnel, directors and officers, and prohibits trading or causing trading of our securities while the applicable person is in possession of material non-public information. The Trading Policy, as well as recent amendments to SEC rules, prohibits directors, executive officers and other Company Personnel specified by us, from time to time, from trading in G-III securities during our established blackout periods, except (i) pursuant to a written trading plan approved by our designated compliance officer that are adopted in accordance with Rule 10b5-1 under the Exchange Act, (ii) stock option exercises for cash with no associated open market transaction and (iii) the surrender of shares to us or the retention and withholding of shares by us in satisfaction of tax withholding obligations with respect to stock-settled incentive compensation awards with no associated open market transaction. The Trading Policy provides that no approved plan may be adopted during a blackout period and no trades may occur after adoption until expiration of the applicable cooling-off period specified in Rule 10b5-1. The appropriate cooling-off period will vary based on the status of the person covered by the Trading Policy. For directors and Section 16 officers, the cooling-off period ends on the later of (x) ninety days after adoption or certain modifications of an approved d plan; or (y) two business days following disclosure of the Company's financial results in a Form 10-Q or Form 10-K for the quarter in which the approved plan was adopted, up to a maximum of 120 days. For all other covered persons, the cooling-off period ends 30 days after adoption or modification of the approved plan. This required cooling-off period will apply to the entry into a new approved plan and any revision or modification of any trading plan under Rule 10b5-1, The Trading Policy also prohibits company personnel from entering into hedging transactions with respect to our securities, pledging our securities as collateral for a loan or holding our securities in a margin account. The Board may, in limited circumstances, permit a share pledge by a director or executive officer after giving consideration to the number of shares to be pledged as a percentage of his or her total shares held and G-III’s total shares outstanding. A copy of the Insider Trading, Hedging and Pledging Policy is available in the “Investors” section of our website at http://www.giii.com.

STOCK OWNERSHIP GUIDELINES

The Stock Ownership Guidelines require:

Position

    

Value of Stock Ownership

Chief Executive Officer

 

6x annual base salary

Vice Chairman and President

 

2x annual base salary

Named Executive Officers who are Directors

 

2x annual base salary

All Other Named Executive Officers

 

1x annual base salary

Non-Employee Directors

 

5x annual cash retainer

Until these share ownership levels are achieved, our executive officers and directors are required to retain 50% of any net, after-tax, shares received upon exercise or vesting of our equity grants. All of our officers and directors are in compliance with our Stock Ownership Guidelines, except for one director first elected by the Board in March 2022, three directors first elected to the Board in June 2023 and one executive officer hired in January 2024, each of whom is making progress to satisfy the guidelines. A copy of the Stock Ownership Guidelines is available in the “Investors” section of our website at http://www.giii.com.

EXECUTIVE INCENTIVE COMPENSATION RECOUPMENT POLICY

Pursuant to the Executive Incentive Compensation Recoupment Policy, or “Clawback Policy,” in the event that we are required to restate our financial statements for any financial year, the Compensation Committee will recoup from the affected executive officers all or part of any annual performance-based bonus or long-term incentive awards that were predicated upon the achievement of financial results that were subsequently restated, subject to a 3-year lookback period. The incentive compensation subject to recoupment will consist of performance-based bonuses (including bonuses paid pursuant to employment agreements) and long-term incentive awards or equity grants, to the extent that such bonuses, awards or grants were predicated upon achievement of financial results that are subsequently restated. A copy of the Executive Incentive Compensation Recoupment Policy is included as Exhibit 97 to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2024.

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DIRECTOR SELECTION AND QUALIFICATION STANDARDS AND RESIGNATION POLICY

The Director Policy describes the Board’s criteria for selecting director nominees and the roles of the Board and the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee in evaluating director independence and qualifications and also includes an overboarding policy. The Director Policy provides that any nominee for director in an uncontested election who receives a greater number of votes “withheld” from his or her election than votes “for” his or her election must tender a written resignation to the Board. The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee will consider the resignation and make a recommendation to the Board as to whether to accept or reject the resignation. Thereafter, the Board will deliberate and determine the action to be taken with respect to the tendered resignation. Following the Board’s determination, G-III will publicly disclose the Board’s decision and the reasons for the decision. A copy of the Director Policy is available in the “Investors” section of our website at http://www.giii.com.

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

We invested significant time and resources furthering our key initiatives, developing programs and expanding our Corporate Social Responsibility (“CSR”) agenda. We have made important progress to reinforce our social and environmental standards as we continue to refine our oversight of our supply chain.

Engage Our People - In line with our entrepreneurial spirit, we have worked hard to advance our strategic priorities and build upon the success of fiscal 2023, skillfully navigating through another tough environment. We remain focused on fostering a stronger, more engaging workplace for our employees. We have invested in new HR systems to enhance our recruitment process and talent retention to ensure we bring in and keep best-in-class talent, and we have expanded our Lunch and Learn programs, led by our leadership team, to facilitate opportunities for continuous learning and development for our team.  

We recognize the importance of ensuring the workers in our supply chain are treated fairly and our vendors are abiding by our Vendor Code of Conduct. Thus, we work closely with suppliers to develop and implement strategies that align with our social and environmental standards. We have also enhanced the effectiveness of our supplier audits through our continued participation in the Social & Labor Convergence Program, allowing us to reduce the number of audits for suppliers, lessening redundancies in shared audits and better assist factories to focus on addressing their most pressing issues.    

Forced labor continues to be a point of focus across our industry, and we work closely with our supply chain partners to mitigate the risk of forced labor being used to make our products or raw materials utilized in our products. We have advanced our internal cotton traceability program through the implementation of annual Cotton Compliance Monitoring training sessions to educate our staff and factories about our requirements and procedures for ensuring the ethical sourcing of cotton. We are enhancing our program by working on ways to couple these traceability lessons with other materials in our products. We continue to explore ways other SaaS technologies might mitigate risks. We also continue to leverage the testing capabilities of ORITAINTM to trace materials back to their fiber origins to mitigate the risk that forced labor is used in our supply chain. We routinely engage with counsel and industry organizations with respect to regulatory developments to ensure our practices and procedures are aligning with the continually developing regulatory landscape, and we remain committed to ensuring proper treatment for everyone who works in our supply chain.

Protect Our Environment - We continue to work towards reducing the environmental impact of our own operations and that of our entire supply chain by enacting sustainable fashion practices and working closely with our supply chain partners.

This year also marked our second year as a part of the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (“SAC”) as we continue to collaborate with others in the industry to strengthen our social and environmental programs and improve vendor performance. We are implementing the SAC’s Higg Facility Environmental Module across our Tier 1 and 2 supplier factories, providing us with greater insight into their environmental impact and allowing us to identify opportunities for further improvement.  

We are making progress on our goal to transition our synthetic materials to 100% recycled sources by 2030. We are also working to increase the use of recycled, organic, and natural fibers, and we are introducing recycled

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synthetic fibers certified by the Global Recycled Standard or the Recycled Claim Standard into a growing number of our products. Notably, in 2023, Vilebrequin, our premier European swimwear brand, manufactured over 80% of its products from preferred materials which consistently deliver reduced impacts and increased environmental benefits.

Over the past year we have furthered our work with our sustainability consultants and are collecting Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions data from across our Company to better understand our GHG emissions. Once we have established our baseline, we will work to implement best practices to reduce our environmental impact. We are also focused on collecting our Scope 3 data and are developing our long-term sustainability strategy.

Invest in Our Communities – Consistent with our longstanding commitment to philanthropy, we have continued to maximize opportunities with our charitable partners, including Ronald McDonald House, Women in Need (“WIN”), Delivering Good, Hetrick Martin Institute and City Harvest. We have developed an internal associate committee so our employees can actively engage in developing and executing charitable initiatives across our organization.

We have a solid foundation in place, which we continue to build upon as we build our new Corporate Sustainability Strategy centered around our core CSR principles: Engage Our People, Protect Our Environment and Invest in Our Community.

The Board of Directors has responsibility for our CSR efforts and continues to consider establishing a separate Board committee that would oversee our CSR efforts.

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COMPENSATION DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS

Our Compensation Discussion and Analysis (CD&A) presents our executive compensation for fiscal 2024, describing how different components of compensation support our business objectives and how we determined the amounts of each component of compensation paid to our Named Executive Officers, or NEOs. In this Proxy Statement, references to a fiscal year refers to the year ended January 31 of that year.

CD&A Table of Contents

29

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

40

Timing of Equity Awards

29

Our Business Performance in Fiscal 2024

40

Other Compensation Elements

31

Our Stockholder Outreach Initiative

40

Employment Agreements

32

Our “Say on Pay” Results Last Year and Our Response

41

OTHER COMPENSATION AND GOVERNANCE PROGRAMS, POLICIES AND CONSIDERATIONS

32

New Compensation Arrangement For Our Chairman and CEO

41

Stock Ownership Guidelines

34

New Compensation Arrangement For Our Vice Chairman and President

41

Clawback/Executive Incentive Compensation Recoupment Policy

35

Inducement Awards For Our Chairman and CEO and Our Vice Chairman and President

41

Anti-Hedging Policy

36

Our Pay Mix is Heavily Weighted Towards Incentive-Based Compensation

41

Anti-Pledging Policy

37

Our Compensation Program Reflects Best Practices

42

HOW WE MAKE COMPENSATION DECISIONS

37

ELEMENTS OF OUR COMPENSATION PROGRAM―WHAT WE PAY AND WHY

42

The Role of the Compensation Committee

37

Our Compensation Philosophy

42

The Role of Management

37

Base Salary

42

The Role of Independent Compensation Consultants

37

Annual Cash Incentives for Our Other Named Executive Officers

42

The Role of Competitive Marketplace Practice

39

Long-Term Incentives

43

The Consideration of Risk

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Compensation Discussion and Analysis

Executive Summary

During Fiscal 2024, the following individuals were our NEOs:

Name

Age

Title

Years with G-III

Morris Goldfarb

73

Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

50

Neal S. Nackman

64

Chief Financial Officer

20

Sammy Aaron

64

Vice Chairman and President

18

Jeffrey Goldfarb

47

Executive Vice President and Director of Strategic Planning

21

Dana Perlman

43

Executive Vice President and Chief Growth and Operations Officer

<1*

*Ms. Perlman became an executive officer on January 8, 2024.

OUR BUSINESS PERFORMANCE IN FISCAL 2024

Fiscal 2024 was an outstanding year. We achieved the second highest year of net income and net income per share in our history and positioned the Company for long term growth and profitability. Late in 2022, our long-term licensor partner, PVH, informed us that it would not grant long-term renewals of our licenses for Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger products and that it intended to produce the products licensed to us as the license agreements expire. Our management was ready to respond to the challenges resulting from this decision. At that time, we entered into amendments to the license agreements for the Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger products that provide for staggered extensions by category. These business lines represented approximately 48% of our net sales in fiscal 2023.

As a result of strategic planning by our management and Board, risk management and contingency planning, we were prepared for this challenge. Our team, led by our Chairman and CEO, Morris Goldfarb, and Vice Chairman and President, Sammy Aaron, used their decades of apparel industry experience and extensive relationships with our retail customers and suppliers to pivot, reducing our dependence on these licenses and concentrating on new initiates. These initiatives included substantial investments to accelerate growth of our key owned brands, Donna Karan, DKNY, and Karl Lagerfeld, as well as entering into new long-term licenses, including for the Nautica and Halston brands. One of the keys to this strategy is to leverage the Company’s owned brands that do not have limits on our ability to sell internationally, through digital channels or in off-price markets. The Company also intends to leverage our ability to license our owned brands in select categories.

Net Sales

$3.1B

Compares to $3.2B last year

Adjusted EBITDA*

$324M

Compares to $266M last year

Non-GAAP Net Income*

$190M

Compares to $139M last year

Non-GAAP Diluted Net Income Per Share*

$4.04

Compares to $2.85 last year

*Please see Appendix A for a reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA, non-GAAP Net Income and non-GAAP Diluted Net Income Per Share to GAAP amounts.

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Under the leadership of Morris Goldfarb, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Sammy Aaron, our Vice Chairman and President, and our dedicated team of executive officers, G-III has successfully operated in fashion markets that are intensely competitive. Our ability to continuously evaluate and respond to changing consumer demands and tastes, across multiple market segments, distribution channels and geographic areas, is critical to our success. This is demonstrated by our ability to reposition the Company and deliver strong results in fiscal 2024.

In addition to the headline results for net sales, adjusted EBITDA, non-GAAP net income and non-GAAP net income per share shown above, we improved our Company’s operating performance in fiscal 2024 in others ways as well:

Inventories were reduced by 27% through rightsizing our inventory levels as we adjusted our buys to account for the higher than usual inventory we carried over from last year. Our inventory levels are now better aligned with expected future sales.
Gross margin increased by 580 basis points to 40.1%.
We expanded our international business by (i) focusing on elevating our wholesale presence through capsule collections and pop-up experiences to expand international sales of our DKNY brand and (ii) expanding our reach in Europe through wholesale and retail store openings and entry into new markets and categories for our Karl Lagerfeld brand.
Our licensing revenue increased 20.7% to $78.2 million.
We expanded our leadership team by adding Dana Perlman, a seasoned apparel industry executive, as Executive Vice President and Chief Growth and Operations Officer.

Our Board believes the relative performance of our Common Stock, as measured by Total Stockholder Return (TSR), is an important performance indicator. During fiscal 2024, our stock price increased by 75%, significantly outperforming the S&P Textiles, Apparel & Luxury Goods Industry Index, which declined approximately 14%, and our compensation peer group which declined by 4%.

Our TSR outperformed the S&P Textiles, Apparel & Luxury Goods Industry Index over the two, three and four-year periods ended on January 31, 2024. In addition, our TSR performance has generally exceeded the performance of our compensation peer group over these periods. We believe that our stockholders attribute this outperformance to the successful measures we have taken following the announcement of the planned long-term termination of the Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger licenses, including by driving our owned brands across categories, continued development and expansion of our DKNY business and repositioning and expansion of our Donna Karan business, expanding our international business, increasing digital channel business opportunities and entering into important new license agreements.

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We maintain a strong financial position with over $1 billion of liquidity in cash and availability at fiscal year-end. We also repurchased $26.1 million of our common stock last year and, in August 2023, authorized an increase in the number of shares covered by our share repurchase program to an aggregate amount of 10,000,000 shares.

A review of our strong financial performance in fiscal 2024, as well as a description of Recent Developments, Strategic Initiatives and Our Strengths is provided above in our Proxy Summary.

OUR STOCKHOLDER OUTREACH INITIATIVE

G-III and its Board of Directors greatly value the opinions of our stockholders and have spent considerable time soliciting their views on a variety of topics, including executive compensation, our progress on board diversity and refreshment and our Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives. During prior years we have invited stockholders owning approximately 90% our Common Stock to engage. Each year, stockholders owning approximately 60% to 70% of our Common Stock chose to participate in engagement. For calendar year 2024, stockholders owning approximately 90% of our Common Stock were invited to engage with us and the holders of approximately 60% of our Common Stock participated in discussions with us.

Our stockholder outreach has been led by our Lead Independent Director, who is also Chairman of our Compensation Committee. Our Executive Vice President and Chief Growth and Operations Officer, our Chief Financial Officer, our Senior Vice President, Investor Relations and the Compensation Committee’s independent compensation consultant also participated in meetings with investors in 2024. During these meetings, we discussed (i) the new compensation arrangements for our Chairman and CEO and Vice Chairman and President, (II) our CSR efforts over the past year, (iii) Company and Board Diversity and (iv) Board refreshment.

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Compensation Discussion and Analysis

OUR “SAY ON PAY” RESULTS LAST YEAR AND OUR RESPONSE

At last year’s Annual Meeting of Stockholders, a majority of our stockholders did not support our Say on Pay proposal. The major issues raised by our stockholders involved the contractual annual cash incentive formulas in effect for our Chairman and CEO and our Vice Chairman and President. Similar views had been expressed in the stockholder outreach in prior years. Stockholders viewed these formulas as awarding too much cash compensation and were troubled that the awards were not capped. In fiscal 2023, the Board determined that the employment agreements with our Chairman and CEO and our Vice Chairman and President were not merely compensation matters but constituted a corporate governance issue for the full Board to address. The Compensation Committee and the Board of Directors listened to the concerns that our stockholders voiced regarding prior compensation arrangements and factored in the lack of stockholder support received for the Company’s Say on Pay proposals in recent years. The Committee and the Board had tried over the years to be responsive to our stockholders, but faced the reality that the Company could not unilaterally change the prior employment agreements with each of Mr. Goldfarb and Mr. Aaron. Each of Mr. Goldfarb and Mr. Aaron voluntarily engaged with us and worked with us in agreeing to new employment agreements.

In fiscal 2024, our Compensation Committee completed negotiations with respect to amending the employment agreements with Morris Goldfarb, our Chairman and CEO and Sammy Aaron, our Vice Chairman and President. These negotiations resulted in each of Mr. Goldfarb and Mr. Aaron voluntarily entering into new employment agreements that significantly modified compensation arrangements with new provisions that align with market norms and are majority performance-based. The new compensation arrangements with each of our Chairman and CEO and Vice Chairman and President significantly reduced the size of annual cash incentives awards to each executive, included hard dollar caps on these awards and reflect a greater weighting for long-term equity to better align with market practices and incentivize long-term performance, shareholder value creation and retention. The new compensation arrangements with each of Mr. Goldfarb and Mr. Aaron are described below under “New Compensation Arrangement for Our Chairman and CEO” and “New Compensation Arrangement for Our Vice Chairman and President.”

The Board believes that the continued leadership of our Chairman and CEO and our Vice Chairman and President was one of its highest priorities, given the challenges created by the long-term loss of the licenses for Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger products and the strategic pivot required for the Company to address the effects of the long-term loss of these licenses.

New Compensation Arrangement for our Chairman AND CEO

Under Mr. Goldfarb’s new employment agreement, the annual cash incentive was aligned with market norms and a significant portion of compensation is delivered in performance-based equity. The chart below compares Mr. Goldfarb’s fiscal 2024 actual compensation, excluding a one-time performance-based inducement grant, and his fiscal 2025 target compensation to the compensation that Mr. Goldfarb would have received in fiscal 2024 under his prior annual cash incentive formula which was based on 6% of pre-tax income. The change to the new annual cash incentive metrics reduced Mr. Goldfarb’s award in fiscal 2024 by 40%, or $6,274,000, compared to what he would have received in fiscal 2024 under the prior formula.

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Compensation Discussion and Analysis

Morris Goldfarb’s Compensation Package (1)

Graphic

(1): Reflects compensation excluding the inducement award made in fiscal 2024. See “Inducement Awards for Our Chairman and CEO and Vice Chairman and President” below for information with respect to the inducement awards.

Highlights of the new compensation package include:

Total compensation for fiscal 2024 declined by 29% compared to what would have been earned under the previous arrangement, excluding the one-time performance-based inducement grant made in fiscal 2024 (described below) as part of his new employment agreement.  
Going forward, Mr. Goldfarb’s target total compensation for fiscal 2025 is 45%, or $9,358,000, lower than what he would have earned for fiscal 2024 under the previous arrangement.
Fiscal 2025 target compensation of $11.35 million is in line with the compensation peer group median of approximately $11.4 million.
Payouts under the new annual cash incentive program will be based on profit performance versus budget rather than on a percentage of pre-tax income. These payments are capped at 241.5% of target. This is a significant change from the prior arrangement that determined cash payments for our Chairman and CEO based primarily on 6% of pre-tax income. See “Annual Cash Incentives for Our Named Executive Officers” below for more detail on the annual cash incentives under the new employment agreements.
Pursuant to the new employment agreement, beginning in fiscal 2025, annual long-term equity awards are majority (60%) performance-based and there is a cap of $6.0 million on the dollar value of awards at grant to prevent excessive pay and an annual limit of 300,000 shares to prevent excessive dilution. See “Long-Term Incentives” below for detail on the awards made in fiscal 2024 and awards to be made beginning in fiscal 2025.
Mr. Goldfarb’s severance benefits were significantly reduced to 2x salary plus 2x target bonus under the new employment agreement, compared to salary continuation through the term of his prior employment agreement and a payment of 3x 3-year average actual bonus.
Mr. Goldfarb’s annual salary was increased from $1,000,000 to $1,350,000. Mr. Goldfarb last received a salary increase in fiscal 2009.

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New Compensation Arrangement for our Vice Chairman and president

Under Mr. Aaron’s new employment agreement, the annual cash incentive was aligned with market norms and a significant portion of compensation is delivered in performance based equity. The chart below compares Mr. Aaron’s FY 2024 actual compensation, excluding a one-time inducement award, and his fiscal 2025 target compensation to the compensation that Mr. Aaron would have received in fiscal 2024 under his prior annual cash incentive formula which was based on 4% of pre-tax income. The change to the new annual cash incentive metrics reduced Mr. Aaron’s award in fiscal 2024 by 31%, or $3,171,000, compared to what he would have received in fiscal 2024 under the prior formula.

Sammy Aaron’s Compensation Package (1)

Graphic

(1): Reflects compensation excluding the inducement award made in fiscal 2024. See “Inducement Awards for Our Chairman and CEO and Vice Chairman and President” below for information with respect to the inducement awards.

Highlights of the new compensation package include:

Total compensation for fiscal 2024 declined by 23% compared to what would have been earned under the previous arrangement, excluding a one-time cash inducement award made in fiscal 2024 (described below) as part of his new employment agreement.  
Going forward, Mr. Aaron’s target total compensation for fiscal 2025 is 42%, or $5,371,000, lower than what he would have earned in fiscal 2024 under the previous arrangement.
Payouts under the new annual cash incentive program will be based on profit performance versus budget rather than on a percentage of pre-tax income. Payouts under the new annual cash incentive program will be capped at 241.5% of target. This is a significant change from the prior arrangement that determined cash payments for our Vice Chairman and President based primarily on 4% of pre-tax income. See “Annual Cash Incentives for Our Named Executive Officers” below for more detail on the annual cash incentives under the new employment agreements.
Pursuant to the new employment agreement, beginning in fiscal 2025, annual long-term equity awards are majority (60%) performance-based and there is a cap of $4.5 million on the dollar value of awards at grant to prevent excessive pay and a limit of 225,000 shares to prevent excessive dilution. See “Long-Term Incentives” below for detail on the awards made in fiscal 2024 and awards to be made beginning in fiscal 2025.
Mr. Aaron’s severance benefits were significantly reduced to 2x salary plus 2x target bonus under the new employment agreement, compared to salary continued through the term of his prior employment agreement and 3x 3-year average actual bonus.
Mr. Aaron’s annual salary was increased from $950,000 to $1,000,000.

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Compensation Discussion and Analysis

INDUCEMENT AWARDS FOR OUR CHAIRMAN AND CEO AND OUR VICE CHAIRMAN AND PRESIDENT

We conduct an outreach to stockholders every year. The major issues raised by our stockholders over the past couple of years involved the contractual annual cash incentive formulas in effect for our Chairman and CEO and our Vice Chairman and President. Stockholders viewed the formulas contained in the prior employment agreements as awarding too much cash compensation and were troubled that the awards were not capped. The new compensation arrangements with our Chairman and CEO and Vice Chairman and President discussed above significantly modified the prior compensation arrangements with new provisions that align with market norms and are majority performance-based. These arrangements agreed to by these two executives eliminated their contractual right to an annual cash incentive based on a percentage of pre-tax income and replaced it with performance metrics consistent with market practice that is expected to significantly reduce the size of annual cash incentive awards to each executive. Each executive was granted an inducement award in connection with agreeing to a significant reduction in the expected amount of the annual incentive cash payment to be received.

Inducement Award for Our Chairman and CEO

Our Chairman and CEO was awarded a one-time performance-based inducement grant in connection with the new employment agreement to retain him and to recognize that the annual incentive cash payments he is expected to receive are significantly less than the contractual right to 6% of pre-tax income, subject to certain conditions, contained in his prior agreement. The inducement award consisted of 700,000 performance shares that would be earned if the stock price more than doubled compared to its price of less than $15 per share when the outline of the new employment agreement was agreed to. If the stock price failed to increase to $25 per share, 100% of these shares would have been forfeited. The following chart shows the number of shares that would vest at each stock price performance level:

Average Stock Price

% of Shares Vested

$30.00

100%

$29.00

90%

$28.00

80%

$27.00

70%

$26.00

60%

$25.00

50%

Less than $25.00

0%

As of January 31, 2024, the stock price exceeded the $30.00 target, based on the average closing price of our stock over fifteen consecutive trading days. When the award vests based on the three year cliff time vesting requirement, a +/-20% relative TSR modifier will be applied to determine the actual number of shares earned. Mr. Goldfarb must continue to provide services to the Company through the third anniversary of the date of his employment agreement to receive any shares, except on his death or disability or if his employment is terminated by the Company without “cause” or by Mr. Goldfarb for “cause” or “good reason” as such terms are defined in the PSU agreement related to this award.

The adjustment for the relative TSR modifier will be determined based on G-III’s TSR relative to the S&P 1500 Apparel, Accessories and Luxury Goods Index. The following chart shows the relative TSR percentage that would be applied at each performance level. If the relative TSR percentile achieved falls between performance levels, linear interpolation will be used to calculate the multiplier percentage.

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Performance

Level

Relative TSR

Percentile Achieved

Relative TSR

Multiplier Percentage

Threshold

≤ 25th

80%

Target

= 50th

100%

Ceiling

≥ 75th

120%

Inducement Award for Our Vice Chairman and President

In connection with entering into his new employment agreement Mr. Aaron, our Vice Chairman and President, was awarded a one-time inducement award of $2,000,000 to retain him and to recognize that the annual incentive cash payments he is expected to receive are significantly less than the contractual right to 4% of pre-tax income, subject to certain conditions, contained in his prior agreement. In addition, Mr. Aaron is entitled to an additional inducement award of $1,000,000 provided that, as of January 31, 2025, the Company shall not have terminated his employment agreement for “cause” and Mr. Aaron shall not have terminated his employment agreement without “cause” or without “Good Reason”, each term as defined in the employment agreement.

OUR PAY MIX IS HEAVILY WEIGHTED TOWARDS INCENTIVE-BASED COMPENSATION

In fiscal 2024, more than 92% of the compensation of our Chairman and CEO and our Vice Chairman and President and 79% of the average compensation of our other NEOs consisted of at-risk annual and long-term incentive compensation.

Chairman and CEO and Vice Chairman and President Compensation Mix (1)

Other NEOs Compensation Mix

Graphic

Note (1): Excludes the inducement awards under the new employment agreements with each of Morris Goldfarb and Sammy Aaron. See “Inducement Awards for Our Chairman and CEO and Our Vice Chairman and President” above for a discussion of these inducement awards.

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Compensation Discussion and Analysis

OUR COMPENSATION PROGRAM REFLECTS BEST PRACTICES

Our compensation program incorporates excellent compensation governance practices that benefit our stockholders:

What We Do

What We Don’t Do

Graphic

We pay for performance and set rigorous goals for short-term and long-term incentives

Graphic

No overlapping metrics for annual cash incentives and long-term incentive awards

Graphic

Conduct extensive stockholder outreach

Graphic

No practices that could encourage excessive risk-taking

Graphic

Double trigger equity acceleration upon a change in control

Graphic

No repricing of underwater stock options without stockholder approval

Graphic

Anti-hedging and anti-pledging policies

Graphic

No guaranteed salary increases or annual cash incentives for NEOs

Graphic

Clawback policy

Graphic

No excise tax gross-ups upon a change in control

Graphic

Capped annual cash incentive payouts

Graphic

No tax gross-ups on perquisites or benefits

Graphic

Robust share ownership guidelines, with 50% share retention requirement until guidelines are met

Graphic

No excessive executive perquisites

Graphic

Annual Say on Pay vote

Elements of Our Compensation ProgramWhat We Pay and Why

OUR COMPENSATION PHILOSOPHY

Our compensation program design enhances stockholder value in the following ways:

Belief in Pay for Performance. A substantial majority of compensation paid to our executives is variable and aligned with the short and long-term performance of G-III because a focus on the short-term leads to long-term success in the dynamic and fast-paced fashion business;
Focus on Annual Profitability. Our annual cash incentive compensation structure is oriented towards bottom-line results, fosters an entrepreneurial environment and empowers management with the flexibility to quickly make decisions that are responsive to ever-changing market conditions, a hallmark of the fashion business;
Alignment with Stockholders. Our long-term incentive program aligns the interests of our executive officers with those of our stockholders and supports maximum stockholder value creation; and
Competitive Packages. We believe the quality of our executive and management team is second to none. We compete with public and private apparel companies and other businesses for talent. As a result, we offer a competitive compensation program, which enables us to attract and retain highly qualified managerial and executive talent necessary to achieve our objectives.

BASE SALARY

Base salaries provide a competitive rate of fixed pay and help us to attract and retain executives needed to manage our business for the benefit of our stockholders. In connection with the new employment contracts, our Chairman and CEO received a salary increase from $1,000,000 to $1,350,000 and our Vice Chairman received a salary increase from $950,000 to $1,000,000. The base salary of our Chairman and CEO had not been increased since fiscal 2009. Base salaries for all other executives were unchanged in fiscal 2024.

ANNUAL CASH INCENTIVES FOR OUR Named Executive Officers

As described above, the annual cash incentive program for Morris Goldfarb and Sammy Aaron was significantly modified in fiscal 2024 as part of the re-negotiation of their employment agreements. Jeffrey Goldfarb was also included in this program during fiscal 2024 after the re-negotiation of his employment agreement. The new annual cash incentive program

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includes a target award opportunity for each executive that is 0% to 200% of the target award based on performance against Adjusted Pre-tax Income targets. The award is subject to a +/-5% modifier based on change in basic common stock outstanding and a +/-15% modifier based on the change in annual Adjusted EPS. Payouts under the annual cash incentive plan are capped at 241.5% of target (i.e., 200% x 105% x 115% at maximum on three metrics) overall.

Under their new employment agreements, the target annual incentive opportunity is $4.0 million for Morris Goldfarb, $3.0 million for Sammy Aaron and $1.5 million for Jeffrey Goldfarb. At the beginning of fiscal 2024, the Compensation Committee approved a target for adjusted pre-tax income of $165 million based on the in-depth review of the budget by the Audit Committee which advised the Compensation Committee that the target was appropriately determined. The adjusted pre-tax income for fiscal 2024 was $247 million. This exceeded the target of $165 million by 50% and exceeded the prior year’s actual result by 18%, resulting in a payout of 200% of the target annual incentive opportunity for the adjusted pre-tax income portion of the target annual cash incentive amount for each of the executives. The modifier for the change in basic common stock outstanding was 102% and the modifier for adjusted EPS was 115%, resulting in an overall payout of 234.6% of the target annual cash incentive for each of the executives. Additional detail is provided below:

and

Annual Cash Incentive Program for Chairman and CEO, Vice Chairman and President and Executive Vice President

Metric

Weighting

Threshold

Target

Maximum

Actual Achievement

Fiscal 2024 Performance Result

(% of Target)

Adjusted Pre-Tax Income vs Budget

100%

$132M

$165M

$178M

$247M

200%

Change in Basic Common Stock Outstanding

Modifier:

+/-5%

-5%

0%

-5%

-2%

102%

Change in Adjusted Earnings per Share (EPS)

Modifier:

+/-15%

-15%

+0%

+15%

+40%

115%

Overall Funding as % of Target

234.6%

Executive

Position

Target Award

Actual Achievement as % of Target

Fiscal 2024 Annual Cash Incentive Awards

Morris Goldfarb

Chairman and CEO

$4,000,000

234.6%

$9,384,000

Sammy Aaron

Vice Chairman and President

$3,000,000

234.6%

$7,050,000

Jeffrey Goldfarb

Executive Vice President

$1,500,000

234.6%

$3,525,000

Note: Annual cash incentive awards paid to Mr. Aaron and Mr. Jeffrey Goldfarb were rounded to the nearest $25,000.

The annual cash incentive program for Neal Nackman, our Chief Financial Officer, was based 60% on adjusted pre-tax income compared to budget and 40% on individual performance. The Committee approved a target award of $1.5 million for fiscal 2024. Individual performance considerations are based on an assessment of management oversight of their responsibilities, contribution to the Company’s business strategy and successful execution and integration of acquisitions, subject to review and approval by the Committee. Based on the strong profit performance of the Company and his strong individual performance, Mr. Nackman’s annual cash incentive award increased by 33% to $1.0 million for fiscal 2024, but the Committee elected to apply negative discretion with respect to his target award after considering his historic compensation level and market practice.

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Dana Perlman, our Executive Vice President and Chief Growth and Operations Officer, joined the Company in January 2024. As a result, Ms. Perlman was not eligible for an annual cash incentive award for fiscal 2024. Ms. Perlman will be eligible for an annual cash incentive award for fiscal 2025. Ms. Perlman is eligible to receive a sign-on bonus of $500,000 after completing six months of service.

LONG-TERM INCENTIVES

We grant long-term incentive awards to our NEOs to align their interests with those of our stockholders by rewarding our executives for achieving long-term performance objectives and enhancing stockholder value. Equity grants subject to multi-year vesting also helps us retain executives in the highly competitive apparel industry.

In April 2023, the Committee awarded equity grants to our Chairman and CEO that were 60% performance-based PSUs and 40% time-based RSUs, each with 3-year cliff vesting. For the other NEOs, equity grants were 50% performance-based PSUs and 50% time-based RSUs, each with 3-year cliff vesting. The PSUs will enable the Named Executive Officers to receive shares of the Company’s common stock if and to the extent that the PSU awards vest based on the Company’s performance over three years against two metrics: Cumulative Adjusted Earnings Before Interest and Taxes (75% weighting) and Return on Invested Capital (25% weighting). The actual number of PSUs that may vest depends on the performance level achieved relative to each metric and may range from zero up to 150% of the number of PSUs awarded in the table below.

Long-Term Incentives


Executive

Fiscal 2024 Award

Grant Date Fair Value

(in thousands)

3-year Cliff Vesting RSUs Awarded

PSUs Awarded

Morris Goldfarb

$4,050

104,180

156,270

Sammy Aaron

$2,700

86,816

86,816

Jeffrey Goldfarb

$1,350

43,408

43,408

Neal Nackman

$ 450

14,469

14,469

The Compensation Committee determined the value of the grants made in the beginning of fiscal 2024 by analyzing the value of grants to peer company executives and assessing our results and long-term outlook. The value of the grant is intended to represent a meaningful portion of total compensation for each executive to align their interests with long-term business performance. The Committee sets performance targets that it considers rigorous based on various company, industry and economic forecasts.

Ms. Perlman joined the Company in January 2024 and was not employed at the time these annual equity awards were granted. Ms. Perlman received a sign-on award of RSUs with a grant date value of $300,000 that cliff vest on the third anniversary of the grant. Ms. Perlman will be eligible to participate in fiscal 2025 equity awards.

Going forward, long-term equity awards for the Chairman and CEO and Vice Chairman and President will be comprised of 60% PSUs and 40% RSUs, each cliff vesting after three years. The dollar value of awards at grant to each of Morris Goldfarb and Sammy Aaron is capped at the target value in order to prevent excessive pay. There is also an annual limit of to the grant of an aggregate of 300,000 shares for Mr. Goldfarb and 225,000 shares for Mr. Aaron in order to prevent excessive dilution. The following table shows the target award opportunities for fiscal 2025.

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Long-Term Incentives


Executive

Fiscal 2025 Target Award Value

(in thousands)

Morris Goldfarb

$6,000

Sammy Aaron

$4,500

Jeffrey Goldfarb

$1,500

TIMING OF EQUITY AWARDS

We do not coordinate annual equity awards to our Named Executive Officers with the release of material non-public information. The Compensation Committee generally makes equity grants to existing employees on an annual basis. Equity grants to new hires or for promotions will generally are made as of the date of hire or promotion or the first business day of the month following the date of hire or promotion. The Compensation Committee retains the discretion to make grants at other times.

OTHER COMPENSATION ELEMENTS

BENEFITS

Our executives are eligible to participate in company benefit plans generally available to all of our employees, which include health, dental, life insurance, vision and disability plans. We also sponsor a voluntary 401(k) Employee Retirement Savings Plan that provides for a matching contribution equal to 100% of the first 3% of the participant’s contributed pay plus 50% of the next 2% of the participant’s contributed pay. We make an annual contribution of $100,000 to Mr. Goldfarb’s nonqualified deferred compensation account pursuant to his employment agreement that is designed to provide retirement benefits that exceed the limits on qualified plans imposed by the IRS, subject to certain requirements.

PERQUISITES

Consistent with our philosophy of attracting and retaining key executives, we offer perquisites to our NEOs, which we believe are consistent in type and amount with those paid by our competitors. We also provide a supplemental life insurance policy to Mr. Goldfarb.

Graphic For additional information regarding perquisites paid to our executive officers, please see footnote 3 to the Fiscal 2024 Summary Compensation Table below.

EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENTS

We have entered into employment agreements with each of Morris Goldfarb, Sammy Aaron, Jeffrey Goldfarb and Dana Perlman, and executive transition agreements with each of Neal Nackman and Jeffrey Goldfarb, which agreements require us to make payments and provide benefits to them in the event of a termination of employment in connection with a change in control or under certain other circumstances.

The apparel business is highly competitive, and we use employment and executive transition agreements to retain our executive officers and achieve our objectives for management continuity. Our employment and executive transition agreements also specify competitive severance benefits designed to minimize negotiation with executives in the event a termination of employment should occur and ensure continued focus on the business if a change of control occurs. Finally, our employment agreements contain covenants which prevent our executive officers from soliciting our customers and employees and disclosing confidential information about our business plans and practices.

Graphic For more information about our employment agreements see “Executive Compensation Tables—Fiscal 2024 Summary Compensation Table—Morris Goldfarb Employment Agreement”, “—Sammy Aaron Employment Agreement” and “—Jeffrey

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Goldfarb Employment Agreement” and “Potential Payments Upon Termination or Change-in-Control” in this Proxy Statement.

Other Compensation and Governance Programs, Policies and Considerations

STOCK OWNERSHIP GUIDELINES

We have adopted robust stock ownership guidelines for our directors and our Named Executive Officers. These guidelines foster an alignment of the interests of our executive officers with those of our stockholders, promote an ownership culture and long-term perspective among our executives, and act as a form of risk mitigation.

Named Executive Officers and our directors who are also our employees must retain shares with a value denominated as a multiple of base salary as follows:

Executive

  

  

Multiple of Base Salary

Chief Executive Officer

 

6x

Vice Chairman

 

2x

Named Executive Officers who are Directors

2x

All Other Named Executive Officers

 

1x

Until executive officers and directors achieve the required guideline, they are required to retain 50% of the net shares obtained from the vesting of restricted stock units or from the exercise of stock options. Shares owned outright and shares held in trust count towards satisfaction of these guidelines; unearned performance shares and unexercised options do not. The Compensation Committee may, in its sole discretion, and in limited instances, grant exceptions to these guidelines. No such exception was granted in fiscal 2024. All our NEOs and directors comply with these guidelines, except for Patti H. Ongman, who was elected as a director in March 2022, Dr. Joyce Brown, Michael Shaffer and Andrew Yaeger, who were elected directors in June 2023, and Dana Perlman who joined the Company as an executive officer in January 2024, each of whom is making progress towards the guidelines.

CLAWBACK/EXECUTIVE INCENTIVE COMPENSATION RECOUPMENT POLICY

Under new SEC rules and NASDAQ’s listing standards, if G-III is required to prepare an accounting restatement, the Compensation Committee will recoup from the affected executive officers all or part of any annual performance-based bonus or long-term incentive awards that were predicated upon the achievement of financial results that were subsequently restated, subject to a 3-year lookback period.

ANTI-HEDGING POLICY

Our directors, executives and other employees are prohibited from engaging in transactions designed to limit or eliminate economic risks from owning G-III’s stock, such as transactions involving any form of margin arrangement, short sales and/or dealing in puts and calls of G-III’s stock.

ANTI-PLEDGING POLICY

Our directors, executives and other employees are generally prohibited from pledging shares of our stock as collateral for any loan or margin account. None of our executives has pledged shares of our stock. The Board may, in its sole discretion and in limited instances, grant exceptions to this policy after considering the number of shares to be pledged as a percentage of the executive’s total shares held and G-III’s total shares outstanding.

2024 PROXY STATEMENT / 41

Table of Contents

Compensation Discussion and Analysis

How We Make Compensation Decisions

THE ROLE OF THE COMPENSATION COMMITTEE

Our Compensation Committee is responsible for determining the compensation of our executive officers and for evaluating and establishing the overall structure and design of our compensation program.

The Compensation Committee consults with our Chairman and CEO in connection with making its determinations regarding compensation of our other NEOs and relies to a considerable extent on his evaluation of each executive’s performance and his recommendations regarding the amount and mix of the total compensation paid to these executives.

THE ROLE OF MANAGEMENT

Our Chairman and CEO annually makes recommendations on the amount and mix of the total compensation of other NEOs to the Compensation Committee. Our Chairman and CEO is not involved in the determination of his own compensation.

THE ROLE OF INDEPENDENT COMPENSATION CONSULTANTS

The Compensation Committee retained Compensation Advisory Partners (“CAP”) to serve as its independent advisor on executive compensation and corporate governance matters beginning in fiscal 2019. CAP is a nationally recognized executive compensation consultancy and serves as the Committee’s independent advisor on executive compensation and corporate governance matters. In fulfilling these responsibilities, CAP assisted the Committee with its redesign of G-III’s executive compensation program by providing insight and analysis of compensation programs and incentives used by G-III’s peers and other public companies, trends in executive compensation and corporate governance, and the evolving policies and procedures of proxy advisory services firms. CAP also assisted with respect to G-III’s stockholder outreach initiatives.

The Compensation Committee retains sole responsibility for engaging any compensation advisor and meets with its advisor, as needed, in the Committee’s sole discretion. CAP has not performed any services other than executive and director compensation and related corporate governance consulting for G-III and performed its services only on behalf of and at the direction of the Committee. Prior to engaging CAP, the Committee reviewed the factors related to consultant independence and determined that no conflict of interest exists.

THE ROLE OF COMPETITIVE MARKETPLACE PRACTICE

The Compensation Committee periodically reviews the compensation design features and executive pay levels of companies that are comparable to G-III to ensure that our programs are competitive. While the Compensation Committee reviews this information, this process serves as one reference point among others. In making determinations regarding our compensation and related governance programs and pay levels, the Compensation Committee also considers our short- and long-term strategic objectives, individual performance, scope of responsibilities, retention concerns, and previously negotiated contractual obligations.

Our peer companies were selected based on the following parameters:

Appropriately sized companies with revenues ranging from approximately 0.5 to 2 times those of G-III when selected;
Companies operating in the apparel and retail industries with a focus on accessible luxury brands; and
Companies from the comparator groups used by our comparators and by stockholder advisory groups.

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Table of Contents

Compensation Discussion and Analysis

The companies in our pay peer group include:

Capri Holdings Limited

Fossil Group, Inc.

Steven Madden, Ltd.

Carter’s Inc.

Lululemon Athletic, Inc.

Tapestry, Inc.

Columbia Sportswear Co.

Ralph Lauren Corp.

Under Armour, Inc.

Deckers Outdoor Corp.

Skechers USA, Inc.

Wolverine World Wide, Inc.

In addition, the Committee reviewed two additional companies which were too large to serve as pay comparators but are sources for practice peer competitive intelligence regarding pay design and practices. The additional companies are:

PVH Corp.

VF Corp.

The median annual revenues of the companies in our pay level peer group are $4.7 billion for a trailing 12-month period compared to $3.1 billion for G-III in fiscal 2024.

THE CONSIDERATION OF RISK

The Compensation Committee considers risk in its deliberations regarding pay levels and practices and believes that G-III’s compensation policies and practices do not create risks that are reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on G- III.

Compensation Committee Report

The Compensation Committee has reviewed and discussed the Compensation Discussion and Analysis required by Item 402(b) of Regulation S-K with management, and based upon such review and discussions, the Compensation Committee recommended to the Board of Directors that the Compensation Discussion and Analysis be included in this Proxy Statement.

Compensation Committee

Richard White, Chairman

Thomas J. Brosig

Patti H. Ongman

Laura Pomerantz

2024 PROXY STATEMENT / 43

Table of Contents

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION TABLES

FISCAL 2024 SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE

The following table sets forth information concerning the total compensation paid to or earned by our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer and each of the three other most highly compensated executive officers (collectively, “Named Executive Officers”, individually, a “Named Executive Officer”), based on fiscal 2024 total compensation. The table sets forth compensation information for the last three completed fiscal years ended January 31 in each year for services in all capacities to us and our subsidiaries.

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Change in

  

  

Pension

Value and

Non-Equity

Nonqualified

Stock

Option

Incentive Plan

Deferred

All Other

Name and

Years of

Fiscal

Bonus

Awards

Awards

Compensation

Compensation

Compensation

Principal Position

Service

Year

Salary ($)

($)

($)(2)

($)

($)

 

($)

($)(3)

Total ($)

Morris Goldfarb

50

2024

1,148,077

20,709,998

9,384,000

188,964

31,431,039

Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

2023

1,000,000

4,499,972

290,888

5,790,860

2022

1,000,000

16,167,626

7,500,000

275,152

24,942,778

Neal S. Nackman

20

2024

750,000

449,986

1,000,000

26,352

2,226,338

Chief Financial Officer

2023

750,000

499,955

750,000

24,800

2,024,755

2022

553,654

1,000,000

360,000

12,072

1,925,726

Sammy Aaron

18

2024

969,039

2,000,000

2,699,978

7,050,000

59,307

12,778,324

Vice Chairman and President

2023

950,000

2,999,982

55,632

4,005,614

2022

760,000

7,122,565

7,250,000

40,309

15,172,874

Jeffrey Goldfarb

19

2024

950,000

1,349,988

3,525,000

36,538

5,861,526

Executive Vice President and Director of Strategic Planning

2023

950,000

1,499,991

1,600,000

35,475

4,085,466

2022

760,000

2,000,000

999,977

22,899

3,782,876

Dana Perlman

< 1 (1)

2024

14,423

299,979

314,402

Executive Vice President and Chief Growth and Operations Officer

(1)Ms. Perlman became an executive officer on January 8, 2024.

(2)The amounts reflect the full grant date fair value of PSUs or RSUs under Financial Accounting Standards Board Accounting Standards Codification Topic 718 (“ASC 718”) awarded to the Named Executive Officers in the applicable fiscal year, and, in addition, for Morris Goldfarb, the grant date fair value of an inducement stock award pursuant to his new employment agreement. For a discussion of valuation assumptions, see Note J to our consolidated financial statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended January 31, 2024.

(3)All Other Compensation includes the following:

    

    

    

Matching

    

    

Life Insurance

Contribution to

Fiscal

Premiums

401(k) Plan

Name

Year

(a)

(b)

Perquisites

Total

Morris Goldfarb